ilani Casino Resort - 500 Nations

Boston 10 Day Trip Report: A Total Immersion Travel Experience in New England's Flagship City

I went to Boston for the first time in a few years and got the chance to visit family and friends. I spent 10 days in the area and got the chance to immerse myself in the city.
Weekend 1 Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/5n5HDu
Monday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/yzKR35
Tuesday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/44E7x2
Wednesday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/2rwX3x
Thursday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/Lq59F0
Friday Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/5BR296
Weekend 2 Pics: https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/99Zx6i

Boston is a coastal flagship city which is one of the oldest cities in the country. The history carries on to this day and as the 10th largest metropolitan area in the country it leads the nation (and world) in education, healthcare, public transportation, and athletics. There is a distinct culture around the city, a substantial depth of fine arts and a defining resilience that makes Boston unique. While the area is very populated it does feel extremely close knit, there is no wonder why it is called ‘The Town.’
When I visit places I like to do what I call a ‘total immersion,’ where I become a local as best as possible and see and do things from all walks of life. I experienced delays on the T, crazy drivers on the Mass Pike, experienced the opening of the Ballet and felt the energy of an evening game at Fenway. I climbed up many hills from Savin Hill, Bunker Hill, Telegraph Hill, Prospect Hill, Corey Hill and many others. I went to farmers markets, grocery stores and local neighborhood eats. I visited libraries, parks and countless universities. I took a variety of transit trips on foot, bike, bus, ferry and rail. I took in the skyline from all angles near and far, from the seaport to South Boston and beyond to the Noanet Woodlands. I did my best to get a clear picture of all facets of life in Beantown.
In the 3 days I had a BlueBike I rode 92 miles utilizing 36 stations. I rode on all 5 major T lines: Blue, Green (B,C,D,E) Orange, Red (Ashmont, Braintree), Silver (SL4) and utilized 30 stations.
I visited 41 different parks, from small urban gardens to large forests with lush views.
Boston is a city that feels extremely vibrant and academic but at the same time it can be quite blue collar, it just depends on where you go. From the youthful energy of Cambridge to the more mature and laid back Brookline, from the ritzy Back Bay to the gritty winding streets of Roxbury... Boston carries on with confidence, for this is Titletown a city core to the formation of our country. This is where our founding fathers made history, this is where English civilization came to fruition in North America.
I had an incredible time in Boston, it is a truly wonderful city and up there with the finest in the world. It is a large, open and welcoming community with a small town at heart. Thank you Boston for the great experiences I will always have the city on my mind.

Raves
-Tons of vibrancy in the core city, lots of pedestrians and cyclists
-Universites
-Hospitals and medical institutions
-Parks with great views and variety of landscapes
-Arts institutions, public libraries
-BlueBike system, tons of stations with bikes in good condition and $10 day pass
-Fenway park, an absolute treasure and finest ballpark in baseball with the best ushers and staff
-Cheap and convenient public transit system, week unlimited pass is a deal
-Tons of history throughout the city and surrounding areas
Rants
-Vibrancy goes down significantly after hours, not much open at night past 9pm
-Massholes
-Old and slow trolley and subway system
-Road network makes no sense whatsoever

Blue Bike Stations Used:
30 Dane St
Alewife MBTA at Steel Place
Ball Sq
Beacon Street & David G Mugar Way
Beacon Street & Massachusetts Avenue
Broadway T Stop
Cambridge Main Library at Broadway / Trowbridge St
Central Square Post Office Bluebikes Stations
Centre Street & Seaverns Avenue
Chinatown T Stop
Columbia Rd at Tierney Community Center
Dartmouth Street & Boylston Street
Franklin Park - Seaver St. at Humbolt Ave
Green Street T Bluebikes Station
Harrison Avenue & Bennet Street
Harvard Square at Mass Ave/ Dunster
Hayes Square - Vine St at Moulton St
Hyde Square - Barbara St at Centre St
ID Building East
ID Building West
Ink Block - Harrison Ave at Herald St
Jackson Square Bluebikes Station
JFK/UMass T Stop
Kennedy-Longfellow School 158 Spring St
Main St at Thompson Sq
MIT at Mass Ave / Amherst St
One Broadway
Roslindale Village - Washington St
S Huntington Ave at Heath St
Savin Hill T Stop - S Sydney St at Bay St
Stony Brook T Stop
Stuart St at Charles St
Union Square - Somerville
University of Massachusetts Boston - Campus Center
Upham's Corner T Stop - Magnolia St at Dudley St
Wentworth Institute of Technology - Huntington Ave at Vancouver St

MBTA Stations Utilized:
Airport
Alewife
Aquarium
Back Bay Station
Boston Univ. East
Broadway
Chestnut HIll
Chinatown
Cleveland Circle
Copley
Downtown Crossing
Dudley Square Government Center
Green Street
Harvard
Harvard Avenue
Haymarket Station
Jackson Square
JFK / UMass
Kenmore
Longwood
Massachusetts Ave
Museum of Fine Arts
North Station
Quincy Center
Ruggles
Stony Brook
Summit Avenue
Symphony Station
Wellington

Eateries:
Bazaar on Cambridge
City Feed and Supply
Courthouse Seafood
Dunkin (original location)
Exodus Bagels
Faneuil Hall Marketplace
Finagle A Bagel
Gene’s Chinese Flatbread Cafe
J.P. Licks (original location)
Joe’s Famous Steak Subs
JP Whole Foods Market
Kupel’s Bakery
Market Basket
South End Whole Foods Market
Sweet Rice JP Thai Sushi
Tasty Burger (original location)
Trader Joe’s Back Bay
Trillium Brewing Company

Parks:
Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University
Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge
Back Bay Fens
Berkeley Community Garden
Blackstone Square
Boston Common
Boston National HIstorical Park
Boston Public Garden
Bunker HIll Monument
Castle Island
Channel Park
Chester Park
Copley Square
Corey HIll Overlook Park
Dorchester Heights
Dorchester Shores Reservation
East Boston Greenway
Fan Pier Park
Forest Hills Cemetery
Franklin Park
Franklin Square
Harriet Tubman Memorial
Jamaica Pond
Larz Anderson Park
LoPresti Park
Louisburg Square
M Street Beach
Malibu Beach
Millennium Park
Noanet Woodlands
North Point Park
Olmsted Park
Paul Revere Park
Peters Park
Prospect Hill Park
Reservoir Walking Trail (Weston Reservoir)
Riverbend Park
Savin HIll Park
Seven Hills Park
Thomas J Butler Memorial Park
Titus Sparrow Park

Attractions:
Boston City Hall
Boston College
Boston Opera House
Boston Public Library
Boston Symphony Hall
Boston University Bridge
Cambridge Public Library
Chinatown Gate
Coolidge Corner Farmers Market
Copley Place
Copp’s Hill Burying Ground
Drydock Center
Dugout Cafe
Encore Boston Harbor
Fenway Park
Gillette World Shaving Headquarters
Hancock Cemetery
Harvard Bridge
Harvard Business School
Harvard Stadium
Harvard Yard
Honan-Allston Branch of the Boston Public Library
John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site
John W. Weeks Footbridge
Long Wharf (South)
Longwood Medical and Academic Area
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts State House
Medford Square
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Northeastern University
Paul Revere Statue
Samuel Adams Boston Brewery
Seaport World Trade Center
Shirley-Eustis House
Skywalk Obervatory
Sowa OPen Market
The James Blake House 1661
The Old House at Peace Field- Adams National Historical Park
Thomas Crane Public Library
Tuft University

Detail Notes:

Thursday
-Fly from Cincinnati CVG to Boston Logan while making a connecting flight stop in DCA
-Arrive at Logan in terminal B, I love the new terminal with large glass windows with the view of downtown
-My family picks me up and we immediately head to East Boston
-We walk around East Boston and check out the skyline views from LoPresti Park
-There is a lot of new development in the neighborhood, it feels like Boston’s version of Long Island City
-Walk back to the car and go by the East Boston Greenway
-We drive under the tunnel into downtown and then drive to the Seaport and park on A St.
-Grab beers at Trillium Brewing Company from the outdoor patio
-Then we go for a walk first around Fan Pier Park and then cross the Fort Point Channel into downtown
-Walk to Faneuil Hall Marketplace and get dinner, I get a platter from the Indian vendor, I love that there is a Magnolia Bakery vendor which I remember getting the banana pudding at the Upper West Side location in NYC
-Drive out to Natick to stay in Hotel

Friday
-Go out with family to Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge
-Walk around the beautiful Puffer Pond
-Walk on the trails and see some of the ammunition storage bunkers
Saturday
-Go to Bat-Mitzvah with family

Sunday
-Spend more time with family, go to relatives house in Jamaica Plain where I would stay for the week
-Go for a run around the Weston Reservoir
-Go out to the JP Licks on Centre St.
-Walk to the Jamaica Pond at night

Monday
-Wake up and go to the Centre St/Seaverns Ave Blue Bike station and pick up a bike
-Ride bike to Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University and bike up to the top of Peters Hill and catch the great view
-Bike down through Roslindale Village then to the Forest Hill station, I love all of the bike/walk trails and bike parking
-I then enter the SW Corridor Park and bike up to the Jackson Square station
-There are tons of other bike commuters making for an enjoyable ride with other fellow people on the trails
-I go to the Stop & Shop to get some chewy bars
-I continue biking down past the JP Whole Foods and make my way to Jamaica Pond where I bike around the Pond counter-clockwise
-A person lets me know I cannot bike on the path in the SW portion of the park so I head for the road on Francis Parkman Dr. and feel very uncomfortable with all of the cars, but once I get to Perkins St. I go back to the trail
-I then make my way up the Emerald Necklace, passing through Olmstead Park
-I go by Longwood Medical area, the MFA and the Back Bay Fens
-I make it to the Massachusetts Ave and take in the views of Cambridge and the Boston skyline
-I bike down through the Back Bay and to the Boston Public Library
-Inside former governor Bill Weld is doing an interview with WGBH and I sit in for a few minutes
-I then walk around and check out the Norman Leventhal map room which I love
-I then check out the various rooms in the old section of the library including the main reading room, which is beautiful and not too crowded or swarmed with tourists (unlike the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in NYC public library)
-Bike over to the Boston Public Garden and check out the landscaping
-Then walk through Beacon Hill, I love the historic streets and architecture
-Check out Louisburg Square, which feels like a small version of Gramercy Park
-Walk to the Massachusetts Statehouse and go inside
-Check out the House of Representative Chamber and Senate Chamber
-I talk with one of the guards (who has a very strong Boston accent) who tells me I should visit the Governor's Foyer and tells me to look for Bill Weld’s portrait which is different from all the others, so I go and visit and it is very different!
-I leave the statehouse and go to the Granary Burying Ground, it is amazing to see such and old Cemetery and I check out the graves of John Hancock and Paul Revere
-Walk to Downtown Crossing (DTX) and I am very impressed by the pedestrian only streets and vibrancy
-I get noodles with a lamb skewer at Gene's Chinese Flatbread Cafe which is very good
-I then walk through Chinatown by the Chinatown Gate and love seeing all of the elderly people playing card games at Mary Soo Hoo Park
-I bike over through the seaport to the Seaport World Trade Center and catch the amazing views
-Continue to bike over to the Reebok World Headquarters and checkout the store/crossfit studio
-I bike around the drydocks, I really like the AT-AT looking cranes
-I then bike over Summer St. and then to 1st street to Thomas J Butler Memorial Park and then make my way to Castle Island
-I dismount my bike (not suppose to bike along the paths on Castle Island) and walk around the Fort Independence and check out the views of planes landing at Logan, I do see quite a few large jets landing from overseas
-I walk around Pleasure Bay to Head Island and then get back on my bike after going to the Harbourwalk
-I bike along M Street Beach and then make my way up to Dorchester Heights up on Telegraph Hill. This area has great views of downtown and feels somewhat like San Francisco
-I bike back over Traveler St. through Channel Park and then go to the Chinatown Orange Line and Ride to Stony Brook
-I then bike over to Franklin Park where I check out White Stadium as there is a high school soccer game going on
-Then bike around the park stopping by the gates of the Zoo and then the Franklin Park Overlook Ruins
-Then I go back where I am staying in JP and go for a run...making a loop from the Pond to the SW Corridor Park then down to Forrest Hills then back up to the Pond

Tuesday
-Walk to Green street and take Orange Line to DTX...then transfer to Red Line, it is very crowded on the platford at the crossing
-Ride North on Red Line crossing the Charles River and to Alewife
-Station feels very Eurpean as there are lots of buses and bike parking
-Bike along Somerville Community Path to Davis station
-Bike north to Medford and check out Tufts University Campus, I love the buildings and greenery
-Bike north across the Mystic River and then to Medford Square
-Continue biking south to Magoun Square, checking out the very residential streets of Somerville
-Go to Market Basket to get some more chewy bars and get a sports drink
-Bike down to Harvard
-Check out the Harvard campus, I first start on the east side of campus and then make my way to the Harvard Yard and Harvard Square
-Bike over to the Cambridge Public Library for a quick phone charge
-Bike over through Inman Square and Union Square
-Bike up to Prospect Hill Park and check out the views of downtown Boston
-Bike through the Central Redline stop and bike over to the west side of the MIT campus to BU bridge
-Bike across BU bridge and check out all of the students crossing the street during class changes on Commonwealth Ave
-Bike back across the bridge taking in the view and then bike along the river on the Dr. Dudley White Bike Path
-When I get to Massachusetts Ave I walk around campus (I get a tour guide map) and check out some of the cool buildings such as Kresge Auditorium and the great dome. The MIT campus is much more visitor friendly than Harvard, you can really go in a lot more buildings
-Then I bike over to check out the Kendall Square area and check out MIT Sloan
-I make my way up to East Cambridge and have a salmon platter at Courthouse Seafood
-I then bike down through North Point Park and Paul Revere Park to Charlestown
-I check out the Boston National Historical Park on the water and then make my way into Charlestown
-I like Charlestown is does have a similar feeling to South Boston and is surprisingly nicer than I thought it would be and lots of very nice looking housing
-I make my way to the Bunker Hill Monument
-Then I run down to catch the ferry (which is included with 7-day MBTA pass) at the Charlestown Navy Yard Ferry Terminal
-Take 7 minute Ferry ride to the Aquarium Terminal and get great views of the harbour and downtown
-I take the Blue Line from the Aquarium to Government Center
-Then I take the D train Green Line to Kenmore
-Get off at Kenmore and walk to Fenway Park, I walk around the park before the gates open and get in line
-Go inside the park (get Bathan Eovaldi bobblehead giveaway) then check out the team store
-Inside awesome teamstore, I go to the back room where there is memorabilia and get an autograph from Julian Tavarez
-I walk into the stadium and I walk right down to home plate, then over to left field and onto the Green Monster, then on the upper deck around to right field, then down to the bleachers then back behind home plate. I love how you are allowed to go nearly everywhere in the park before the game starts (as opposed to Wrigley Field or Yankee Stadium). The ushers are so friendly and really go out of their way to make a great experience.
-Go to 5th row in Grandstand section 19 to watch the game which is a great view
-See a lot of Red Sox Legends in the Park (Pedro Martinez and Carlton Fisk)
-See Mike Yastrzemski hit a home run and the crowd gives a standing ovation
-Leave game and head to Tasty Burger
-Walk across the Fens and see a movie being filmed at the MFA coming to Netflix called ‘The Sleepover’
-Catch 39 Bus back to accommodation
Wednesday
-Wake up and bike over to Exodus Bagels, I get a plain with cream cheese
-Bike through Roxbury, go by Boston Latin Academy and up through Dudley Square
-Check out the Shirley-Eustis House
-Bike to Upham’s Corner and check out the Dorchester North Burying Ground. I love all of the street art murals in Roxbury and Dorchester, while these are some of the poorer neighborhoods in the city, they still are not that down looking and have a good community feel
-Check out the James Blake House (built in 1661!)
-Bike to the JFK/UMass Red Line stop and head south to Quincy Center
-Check out downtown Quincy and visit Hancock Cemetery which is very cool (set apart in 1640!)
-Walk up to check out the Adams National Park Visitor Center and then the The Old House at Peace Field, then I walk to the Quincy Homestead
-Walk through Faxon Field and then go to the Original Dunkin Donuts on Southern Artery and get a 10 pcs munchkins (and immediately eat all of them)
-Walk back downtown and check out inside Thomas Crane Public Library
-Take Red Line back to JFK/UMass and bike along Dorchester Shores Reservation
-Bike around JFK Presidential Library and then check out the UMass Boston Campus, I take a break in the beautiful cafeteria overlooking the water and charge my phone and rest for a few minutes
-I then bike down around Savin Hill Cove past the Vietnam War Memorial and over to Malibu Beach
-Then I bike up to the top of Savin Hill but the view is disappointing as there really isn’t a view
-I then take the Red Line from Savin Hill to Broadway and check out the Gillette HQ complex and take in the views from the city
-I bike to the South End Whole Foods and get a turkey sandwich
-I then go to Emerson and check out the buildings there and eat my turkey sandwich and then walk through the North End
-I check out the Paul Revere Statue, Old North Church and Copp’s Hill Burial Ground
-Go to North Station and catch the Green E line to the MFA
-Check out the MFA which is very very impressive, my favorite section is the American landscape paintings. I also see some work done by Frank Duveneck who is from where I live in Covington, KY (right across the bridge from Cincinnati)
-Bike over to meet a friend at Harvard, to get there I bike through Longwood and catch the stunning sunset John W. Weeks Footbridge
-Take Red Line from Harvard Square to DTX then take Orange line to Jackson Square
-Bike to the JP Whole foods and get 2 cans of beans to eat
-Bike back to accommodation, eat beans and go to sleep

Thursday
-Wake up and take Orange Line to Wellington, there is a Dunkin in the stop and there are many locals waiting to get their fix
-Take the Encore shuttle to the Encore Casino (originally I got on the employee shuttle)
-Walk through the Casino and grounds, the physical plant is amazing and there are some nice views of the Mystic but overall I am not that impressed as the shopping is not that high end and the minimums are high for the table games
-I take the shuttle back to Wellington and then take Orange Line to Back Bay Station then I take the Green B line from Copley Square to Harvard Ave
-I then walk to Bazaar on Cambridge and get ½ pound of lox and a loaf of dark brown sourdough rye 'Borodinsky bread.'
-I eat outside at a local park right next to the Honan-Allston Branch of the Boston Public Library and then check out the library inside
-I then walk over to Harvard Stadium and check it out and the Harvard Business School and check out the campus and meet with a friend there briefly
-I catch the 66 bus back down to Harvard Ave into Brookline where I grab a bagel at Kupel's Bakery walk around and check out the JFK National Historic Site
-Then make my way down to Coolidge Corner and then check out the Brookline Farmers Market
-Then walk on Beacon Street and up Summit Ave to Corey Hill Overlook Park which the views are ok but then walk back down and catch the Green Line C train
-Get off at the end of the C train at Cleveland Circle and walk around Chestnut Hill Reservoir from the north side
-I then walk through Boston College Football stadium and the campus, which is very beautiful
-I then walk down Hammond St. to the Chestnut HIll D train and take it to Longwood station
-I walk through Longwood at all of the world class medical schools and institutions and walk by Boston Latin School
-I then walk through Northeastern campus and go to Ruggles station and catch a brand new Orange Line train which I take to Chinatown
-I then walk though the Boston Common and grab a Mcdonalds burgefries/McChicken and eat on a bench in the common and do some people watching
-Then I go to the Boston Opera House to see the premiere the 2019-2020 Boston Ballet which is a performance of Giselle which I love
-After the show then check out the new downtown Taco Bell but it is a complete mess so I just take an Uber back

Friday
-Wake up and go to Green St. Orange Line, there is a brand new train but it is going outbound to Forrest Hills so I take an old train to Massachusetts Ave station and walk through the SW Corridor Park. I love the juxtaposition of the historic walk ups to the towering skyscrapers
-I make my way to Harriet Tubman Square, Chester Park, Franklin Square and Jackson Square
-I walk through the Berklee Community Garden
-I then walk up to check out the Boston Marathon Bombing Memorial Finish Line and get a bagel w/cream cheese at Finagleabagel
-Then I meet some friends and walk through the Copley Place shops and then go up to the Skydeck on the top of the Prudential Building
-The views are great but I do not think worth the $20+ price of admission. Its is cool though to see all of the places I have been from a birds eye view, especially the water and all of the rowhouse neighborhoods
-Then take Prudential Green Line to Haymarket and check out the farmers market
-I then head to City Hall Plaza and take in the Boston Climate Strike
-Next I take Green Line E train from Government Center to Symphony Hall and go inside
-I see performance of the Boston Symphony I get a seat on the first balcony to have a view of the two piano concerto. There is also a world premiere piece commissioned by the BSO and Beethoven's Fantasia featuring The Tanglewood Festival Chorus.
-After the Symphony I take the Orange Line to Stoney Brook and get some bagels from City Feed
-In evening head to Millenium Park and go for a run, take trail down to the Charles River and then take in the sunset from atop the skyline loop
-Go out to dinner at Sweet Rice in JP

Saturday
-I go for a morning run, I first cross the Emerald Necklace into Brookline to check out Larz Anderson Park. Then I go through the Arboretum and the Bussey Brook Meadow to the Forest Hills Cemetery. I visit the burial places of Revolutionary War General Joseph Warren, Poet E.E. Cummings, Abolitionist William Llyod Garrison and Nobel Laureate Playwright Eugene O'Neil.
-Then I go to the Sam Adams Brewery and go for a toutasting where I try the Boston Lager, Oktoberfest, and Pumpkin Ale
-Then take 39 bus to the Back Bay and walk down Newbury St and check out all of the shops
-Get a burrito at the Back Bay Trader Joes and then walk to the Boston Common where the ‘Freedom Fest’ is taking place, there is a lot of smoke which I cannot handle so I walk around
-I check out the ‘Friends’ couch set and then take the Silver Line from Tuft Medical Center to Dudley Square
-I get a shredded beef sandwich at Joe’s which is really big just what I needed
-Then I take the 28 bus to the orange line back to JP
-At night I take 39 bus to Copley and take Green Line B train to Boston University East and I go see the Mendoza Line Comedy show at the Dugout Cafe

Sunday
-I wake up and take bus to the South end and check out the SoWa open market, I check out the food stalls, outdoor crafts market, indoor vintage market and artist studios
-I then grab some food at the South End Whole Foods and then take Orange Line/Orange line shuttle back to JP
-Then go for an afternoon run through the Noanet Woodland and catch the nice view of downtown Boston and forest from the top of the lookout

Monday
-Wake up before dawn, and take Orange Line to the Blue Line at Government Center and take the Blue Line to the Airport
-Check out the skyline from the terminal one last time and then fly back to CVG
submitted by redsox92 to boston [link] [comments]

Interesting WSJ article that many here can relate to...

With Biotech Stocks, Investors Love the Thrill of the ChaseDOW JONES & COMPANY, INC. - 08/05/2020
By Gregory Zuckerman and Michael Wursthorn
Eric Distenfeld is rolling the dice on CytoDyn Inc. (CYDY)
Last month, the real-estate executive bought 1,000 shares of the unheralded biotech company, which hopes to discover a Covid-19 drug.
Now, he spends the day tracking shares, checking news and debating friends whether CytoDyn (CYDY) can overcome the odds. Mr. Distenfeld leaves most of his stocks alone. When it comes to CytoDyn (CYDY), he is obsessive.
"It's like being in Vegas without the hangover," says Mr. Distenfeld, 40 years old, a former portfolio manager who lives in Teaneck, N.J.
Few stocks have captured investors' affections lately like biotech companies chasing coronavirus advances. Stocks such as Moderna Inc. and Novavax Inc. have soared, but so too have tiny ones a long way from an approved U.S. vaccine or treatment, including CytoDyn (CYDY), Equillium Inc. and Humanigen Inc., all of which are up between 207% and 944% this year, thanks in large part to the fervor of individual investors.
Their passion stems from the promise of medical advances that can send shares surging. Small biotechs constantly need financing, so executives tend to be more comfortable promoting themselves, efforts that also can hook investors.
"People tend to fall in love with biotech companies," says health-care investor Brad Loncar at Loncar Investments. "There's an emotional aspect given that it is medical-related and then, because the stocks are so volatile, like a casino, it adds fuel to the fire on both sides."
For every investor playing biotech stocks for fun and profit, another, like Tom Yarborough, has an unshakable conviction these companies are nearing historic breakthroughs.
"They have so many potential cures," says Mr. Yarborough, a 74-year-old retired stockbroker in Cape Canaveral, Fla., referring to the range of diseases CytoDyn's (CYDY) key drug, leronlimab, might address. "There are 59 different possibilities that it could cure, including Covid."
The love for risky biotech shares isn't unrequited. Mr. Yarborough has made over $100,000 from his CytoDyn (CYDY) shares. He had 110,000 shares at one point, but sold some over the years. He still holds 27,000 -- worth about $136,890 -- spread across investment accounts held by him and his family. The Vancouver, Wash.-based company, which closed at $5.07 on Tuesday, has climbed more than 1,000% since Mr. Yarborough bought shares four years ago.
"It's my only position," says Mr. Yarborough. "I'll always own shares; my commitment, my loyalty is there."
CytoDyn's (CYDY) valuation ballooned to more than $4.5 billion in May from just over $100 million last year, after the Food and Drug Administration greenlighted the use of leronlimab for Covid-19 patients in emergency situations and clinical trials.
Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, N.Y., is evaluating the drug for Covid-19 in two separate trials; results are expected soon, says Dr. Harish Seethamraju, Montefiore's medical director of lung transplantation.
Leronlimab's mechanism of action, or how it is supposed to work, makes sense to CytoDyn (CYDY) fans. Leronlimab aims to block a receptor that causes cytokine storms, severe immune-system reactions that inflame and fatally damage lungs and other organs of some Covid-19 patients.
Some investors, like Judah Kraut, 41, are doing more than rooting for CytoDyn (CYDY). He is searching out doctors with experience with leronlimab and sharing the results with friends, though he recognizes what he is finding are just anecdotal reactions.
"I know of 19 people who have invested because of me, so I'm a little nervous about that," says Mr. Kraut, who lives in New York City and is finishing a Ph.D. in ancient Near Eastern literature at the University of Pennsylvania. " But the theory it's a scam would require doctors with impeccable credentials to be in on it; that would be mind- boggling."
There are warning signs, though. Most experts don't give CytoDyn (CYDY) much chance of success. The company hasn't made any money other than what it pulls in from stock sales. It has been seeking FDA approval for leronlimab to combat HIV and about two dozen types of cancers over the better half of a decade.
Its chief executive, Nader Pourhassan, promotes his company in news releases, articles and videos paid for by the company. In late April, he appeared in a sponsored video claiming that almost 95% or 100% of patients who had Covid-19 and were treated with leronlimab survived testing. Within the same video, he clarified that his figures included 28 patients across the country -- not the 11 others who also received the drug in New York, some of whom died.
"That's a spectacular result, and we wanted to make sure everybody knows that," Mr. Pourhassan said in the YouTube video posted by Proactiveinvestors.com, a platform that charges companies $25,000 a year to run promotional content. CytoDyn's (CYDY) shares rose nearly 8% that day.
A CytoDyn (CYDY) presentation shared with The Wall Street Journal showed seven of the patients in New York had died as of mid-May. In a broader study across the country of 34 patients, five patients had died and 15 were said to have improved.
"I'm giving information as honestly as possible. When it changes, I give that," Mr. Pourhassan said of his interactions with investors.
On April 27, CytoDyn (CYDY) said it had submitted a drug marketing application to the FDA, sending shares up another 17%. But the company said in subsequent news releases that the submission included mock data sets and wouldn't be considered complete until it provided clinical data on May 11. The FDA ultimately refused to grant the license in July, sparking criticism from some investors toward the company during a conference call several days later.
Mr. Pourhassan said the FDA requested CytoDyn (CYDY) make those additional statements after determining the application was incomplete.
Last week, a YouTube video titled "A Drug You Can Invest In and Simultaneously Save the World" featured testimonials, including one by actor Charlie Sheen, who said that he has enrolled in a trial for leronlimab, which also is being studied to treat HIV infection, and that he "felt great."
A representative for Mr. Sheen said he wasn't compensated for his appearance.
In April, Mr. Pourhassan sold 4.8 million shares of his company for $15.7 million, according to securities filings. Mr. Pourhassan, who has a doctorate in mechanical engineering, once faced federal charges over allegedly selling fake Native American goods. The charges were dropped. He said the charges had no merit.
As for the stock sale, he said, "I've been waiting all these years, I might as well have some security for myself."
Richard Trauger, who worked at CytoDyn (CYDY) between 2011 and mid-2013 and served as its chief science officer, says he witnessed Mr. Pourhassan exaggerate claims during interactions with investors.
Once, when Mr. Pourhassan was chief operating officer, he told an investor group CytoDyn (CYDY) would have a license from the FDA in two years. Mr. Trauger said he objected to the timeline, drawing the ire of Mr. Pourhassen.
"He went off on me," Mr. Trauger said, adding that Mr. Pourhassan had asked him "if it's possible. 'Of course, anything is possible,' I'd say, but it's not likely. That's all he needed to hear."
"I hope it works," said Mr. Trauger of CytodDyn's drug. "But I haven't seen any data, and that's the problem."
New Jersey investor Mr. Distenfeld is uncomfortable with Mr. Pourhassan's sale of personal stock and his relentless promotion.
But the possibility that CytoDyn (CYDY) might achieve a breakthrough is worth the risk, he says.
"I can make five times my investment and my downside is 80%," Mr. Distenfeld says. "I go to Vegas and play poker against pros which is a losing proposition -- this is more fun and has better odds."
Write to Gregory Zuckerman at [email protected] and Michael Wursthorn at [email protected]
(END) Dow Jones Newswires 08-05-20 0530ET Copyright (c) 2020 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.
submitted by Wall_Street_Titan to ATHX [link] [comments]

Accessing all the Vancouver Bridges

Update notes: finished adding all the bridges, added a link to photos. I will try to format everything to be a bit nicer and/or make a copy at another location that allows for easienicer formatting.
As requested by raleighspritely in the other bridges thread, this post is intended to help generally newer riders figure out specifically how to get onto each bridge in each direction, where all most of the exit options go and any other weirdnesses each bridge may have.
I'll assume you know roughly where you are and roughly how to get to each bridge. Some are easy to find the entrances for (Burrard), some are weird (Cambie, southbound) and some have entrances a long way from where the cars access (Golden Ears) so if they're super weird I'll try and give you more specifics.
Photos from the day showing most of the bridges: https://imgur.com/a/RvTUs0V (missing: 2nd Narrows, KSB, Canada Line, Arthur Liang)
And now to talking about crossing bridges!
Granville - follow the instructions for Burrard or Cambie
If you insist on using the GSB (don't) SB access is easiest via Howe St and NB access at 5th & Granville
Burrard
Easiest to get onto IMO as the access is right at the ends of the bridge
Cambie
Going southbound on Cambie is super weird to get to unless you're already on Nelson St
Lion's Gate
North Bound:
South Bound:
Second Narrows/IronworkersThis is one of the weirdest/awkwardest, particularly at the north end
North Bound:
South Bound
Access is here basically across from Phibbs. Many ways to get to it, but you've gotta get to that spot to go south.
Exiting: takes you down through the trees, watch for the pair of switchbacks. You'll end up at the bottom of Skeena St.
Arthur Laing
I regard this as an "experts only" type bridge that I wouldn't recommend to anyone not comfortable with riding in fairly close proximity to cars. There's no separated lane and just a narrow shoulder. That said, I don't feel unsafe on this bridge for some reason, but that might just be from riding it a bunch and being used to riding next to cars. Anyways, onto how to get on/off:
Southbound: access is via the car ramp at where Marine & Granville all come together in a 6 lane clusterfuck that was meant to be the highway through Vancouver. Normally I access coming off NW Marine, onto the clusterfuck, pick up speed down the hill and (with a lot of shoulder checking) get across the right most lane onto the ramp. Go up the ramp and stick to the right.
Exiting: things get dicey/exciting. You'll be crossing roads at speed so be shoulder checking.
North Bound: you can either access off the paths off Airport Rd here or by riding north along Russ Baker Way and basically sticking right and following the signs to Vancouver.
Exiting: again a bit dicey with some potential lane crossing
Pitt River
This is one of the nicest crossings. All the recently built (or updated) bridges are really, really nice once you're on the deck (Pitt River, Port Mann, Golden Ears + Ironworkers post update).
The cycle/pedestrian lane is on the north side of the span and is nice and wide. Access on the west end requires crossing Belfast Ave/Fremont Connector that loops under the bridge. Since access is all for the one side crossing my instructions are written for West->East travel but basically just do them in reverse for East->West.
Coming from NW (Trabouley Poco Trail/Deboville Slough), you do a couple zigzags and hairpins and crossing Belfast St but you can see your target the whole time so this bridge is honestly one of the easiest to get onto.
Coming from the SW, you go under the bridge parallel to the Fremont Connector then see the access to your left. If you were to keep going on the path instead you'd eventually end up at Deboville Slough.
East end of the bridge drops you in Pitt Meadows. As you exit (eastbound) you can immediately do 180deg turn left to get onto the trails. Another left at the river to go south, north and you can make your way out to Pitt Lake on the trails. To access the trail parallel to, and on the south side of, Lougheed Highway take the left at the river then left again at Ferryslip Rd.
If you go straight Old Dewdney Trunk Rd is a pretty nice ride towards Maple Ridge.
Golden Ears
Alright, this one is possibly the most difficult unless you know exactly where to go, partly because they're a long way along the bridge from where cars access. The Southbound Access is at 113B & Airport Way (Maple Ridge/Pitt Meadows). The northbound access is at 100A Ave & 201St (Langley)
Southbound
Northbound
Access is at 100A Ave & 201St. You go up the multilevel round ramp. Your exit will basically be the aforementioned 113B roundabout, you can go straight through it to get onto Maple Meadows Way towards the mall, right will change into 203St as it turns north or go left and west towards the airport.
Canada Line Bridge
This one is on the side of the Canada Line bridge section between Marine & Cambie Station & Bridgeport Station.
North connection is on Kent Ave S @ Cambie. However you have to go east from Kent Ave N & Cambie to turn south to get onto Kent Ave S and access the ramp. If you're coming down Cambie, hang a right on Kent Ave N.
South Connection is at River Road and Van Horne Way.
If you're going North then east, my recommendation is take Cambie north, then cut east at 59th. Kent Ave N between Cambie and Ontario sucks butt and cars are frequently impatient assholes on that section (it's also rough, needs a repave and has a lot of rail tracks).
If you're going north then west you can go west on Kent Ave N and then right on Heather before climbing a bit and taking the westbound route of your choice.
If you're just going north then Cambie, Ontario & Heather are all pretty good choices with Ontario & Heather being quieter. I can't remember how all of Heather's crossings are since I haven't ridden it past 59th in years.
If you're going South, you can go:
Formatting is becoming a pain because this is getting long. Sorry!
Port Mann
This one is like the Pitt River Bridge in that the pedestrian/bike path is only on the north/east side of the bridge deck.
West access is where the Port Mann passes over United Boulevard and where Unite intersects the Mary Hill Bypass offramps. If you're coming off the bridge you can go south/west on United and eventually work your way over towards Braid Station. If you go east on the Mary Hill Bypass you can connect to the Traboulay PoCo trail, Argue St and work your way up to the Pitt River bridge. There's also a mess of trails in and around Colony Farm but you're on your own for that :)
East access is a ways up a pretty decent hill at 152st/112Ave by Dogwood Campgrounds. If you're going north/west, the signage is good. Just don't take the overpass over the highway. How you get to 152/112...up to you. It's a big grid!
Alex Fraser
Ok, this one is another bit of a mess in terms of access. I don't think this one is technically unidirectional like the others, but I recommend riding the same way as cars are travelling and this guide will be based on that. Careful on the deck, there's a bunch of spots where you have to dodge the bases of signs and other spots where the path just shifts left/right.
Southbound:
You've made it over the Queensborough or come in from Richmond. You've made it onto the Annacis Channel bridge and are approaching Annacis island. You'll see a bus-stop on an island, you want to get there (if not busy, drop the curb & cut across, otherwise there's a crosswalk to use), take the crosswalk that goes parallel to the bus-only section of intersection, onto the sidewalk on the far-far side and then left and you'll see the path onto the bridge. You'll get dropped off with the choice of left or right. Left takes you towards HWY17, River Rd which are the two options for getting to the ferry (take River, it's quieter and only marginally slower). Right will take you under the bridge, and after you go past Planet Ice you can go left towards River Rd east, right-then-right to get onto Nordel north/east or just right for the Delta-South Surrey Greenway.
If you're trying to get to South Surrey, go as if you're going up Nordel, get over the overpass, then take the trail that cuts back to the right. This is the North Delta Greenway and is superior to the DSS Greenway in basically every way including being WAY smoother (I ride it on my carbon road bike on 25mm tires).
North Bound:
Starting from Planet Ice, take the path up onto the bridge, ride across, question why you're out here and didn't just take the Massey Shuttle to get home faster...
At the north end of the bridge, you'll end up next to the Annacis exit ramp. At the end of it, you want to take the small crosswalk onto the island with the bus stop, across Cliveden ave onto the island on the far side, then across another little crosswalk onto the path and hang a left. Stick to this path, you'll go back over the Annacis Channel and find yourself at a zig-zagging ramp. At the bottom of that you have the options of:hard right: path through to Hamilton Highway Park where you can take an overpass towards River Rd
left then right: onto Boundary Rd then Dyke rd, you can use this to get over towards Westminster Highway via Fraserwood Way.
left then left (generally recommended): take Boundary Rd north. At Boundary & Boyd you can go right to the Queensborough or left onto Westminster Hwy which you can use to get all the way to Richmond or to connect to River Rd
Queensborough
because New West is at a 45deg angle I'll be using "up/down and top/bottom" for this bridge because it's effectively a hill. Top is 22nd St station end, bottom is Queensborough Landing.
The top connection is just below 22nd St Station. If you're coming from 22nd St station just take the bridge down, it'll drop you on Boyd St. Left takes you to QB Landing. Right takes you to...not a lot. It's narrow, you'll probably have to slow down a bunch as you pass people.
If you're coming from Market Crossing area or New West (both via Marine Dr) I recommend taking the "up" side of the bridge down because it has about 1% of the traffic the "down" side does.
To get to it, the access is the ramp on the "cars up" side of the bridge. Otherwise, you can use the ramp on the "cars down" side to connect to the "down" side.
Either way as you're going down, watch for the hairpins at the bottom!
If you're going up and heading to downtown New West take the "up" side. Head east along Marine/Stewardson. You can eventually head right down a side street to get to S&O because that's why you're in New West right? If not, you're at S&O now. Best way to get through to the rest of downtown is via the Quay.
If you're going up and heading to anywhere else take the "down" side and go all the way to 22nd St Station. Right and past the station connects to 7th Ave across New West. Left you can use to get onto both Marine Dr or Marine Way to go west to Market Crossing, Big Bend, Glenlyon, River District. Straight turns into the BC Parkway and travels under the skytrain past Edmonds, Royal Oak, Metrotown stations.
Knight St
Recommendation: if you can, keep going west and take the Canada Line Bridge. This bridge was NOT intended for cyclists at all as you're about to learn and this section may get a little rant-y.
Northbound:
Southbound (I haven't gone SB on this bridge in a long time)
Access is via the onramp at Inverness & Marine. If crossing SB on Inverness watch for cars not understanding how stoplights work and driving into the intersection.
Take the on-ramp, hop onto the sidewalk.
First exit is Mitchell Island, get across the island. Get back onto the sidewalk.
Second exit is Bridgeport and provided you take that off-ramp you'll end on a sidewalk on Bridgeport pointed west. First intersection will be Sweden Way, turn left for IKEA, right takes you up to Vulcan Way which can be used to connect to River, No5 & No6 Rds.
Opinion: the KSB needs a cycling infrastructure update more than the GSB. The GSB is bad, but at least Cambie and Burrard are basically adjacent.
Oak St Bridge
Disclaimer: I have ridden across this bridge exactly once, only north bound on the southbound side. I will provide links to where I think the access to the NB path is, but I can't guarantee it.
This accesses I used for this bridge are near enough to the Canada Line Bridge so I would recommend just using that. Also the access Oak St Bridge are all off bigger roads so just awkward to get to.
The north end of the SB path is a crosswalk between 71st Ave & 72nd Ave on Oak St. ( https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B012'22.1%22N+123%C2%B007'49.4%22W/@49.2061485,-123.1325803,765m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.2061446!4d-123.1303973 )
The south end of the SB path is at the southeast end of the Shanghai Wonderful restaurant parking lot. https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B011'30.5%22N+123%C2%B007'10.7%22W/@49.1918179,-123.1201938,191m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.1918174!4d-123.1196477
I *think* the south end of the NB path is here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B011'25.0%22N+123%C2%B006'55.9%22W/@49.1902744,-123.1163805,382m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.1902728!4d-123.1155145
I don't know how to get there.
I think the north end of the NB path is effectively the intersection of SW Marine @ Shaughnessy St. https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B012'17.7%22N+123%C2%B007'45.5%22W/@49.2047843,-123.1293076,104m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.2049204!4d-123.1293171
Once you're on the bridge it's just ride along until you're at the other end. The surface is weird concrete sections that have all gone a bit convex so it's a weird kinda bumpy ride.
rest to be continued later including: Pitt River, Golden Ears, Port Mann, Alex Fraser, Queensborough, Knight St, Canada Line, Oak St and Arthur Laing. If you need to go between New West and Surrey I recommend just taking the Skytrain.
submitted by unclebumblebutt to vancouvercycling [link] [comments]

Darrel Deeg (June 10, 1937 - March 21, 2020)

DARREL DUANE DEEG
June 10, 1937 - March 21, 2020
&
DIANA (STEVENSON) DEEG
May 26, 1938 - March 30, 2020
source: http://obits.columbian.com/obituaries/columbian/obituary.aspx?n=darrel-duane-deeg&pid=195949998
submitted by portlane to deadpeoplepdx [link] [comments]

I have friends outside of H.S but not inside. Is that ok?

Im in grade 11. During grades 8-10.5 i had severe tourrettes and had to miss a bunch of inclass schooling due to high amounts of stress and anxiety from my tics. I missed a LOT of school and did assignments in the rescource room or at home. Mid-grade 10 i was able to turn things around and become a full-time student not needing the help of support workers. My training wheels were taken off per say.

Once i started going to classes regularly i was able to start mingling with students in a couple classes that i had already talked too. I would be laughing and joking with them inside of the classroom. But, During breaks i would stand around with the inclass friends but wouldnt make much convo with them. During lunch it would be nearly impossible to locate those friends since my school is MASSIVE and would hang out at my older cousins house a five min walk away. I would always put on a smile and try and be “cool” and “fit-in” but sometimes it would be a bunch of horsesh*t tbh.
Once school would end i would have little to no contact with them. Only one group chat for a class that requires a permanent 4 man group for the year. Do keep in mind that i live in another nearby municipality 10 mins away from my school. If anybodys from Vancouver. School is in south-Van and i live in Richmond near the River Rock Casino. But i still feel like i dont hang out with these friends outside if school.
Now, outside of school, i have a dozen “bros” that were made by our parents being great friends. Weekend bbqs, bday parties, NFL sundays, etc. I love these guys to death. Every weekend theres a function that included at least a couple of them and we’d hang out and watch UFC fights or hockey games together. But, inside of school i feel a little lonely. And during the week nobody from that group is avaliable. So i end up just being by myself. Am i overeacting when seeing other students’ snapchat stories and igs with them hanging out with their school friends? Or is it ok to have my friend group outside of school? This would be advice for the next school year as this year is most likely written off due to COVID-19.
submitted by KingKash2003 to TeenagerAdvice [link] [comments]

I have friends outside of H.S but not inside. Is that ok?


Im in grade 11. During grades 8-10.5 i had severe tourrettes and had to miss a bunch of inclass schooling due to high amounts of stress and anxiety from my tics. I missed a LOT of school and did assignments in the rescource room or at home. Mid-grade 10 i was able to turn things around and become a full-time student not needing the help of support workers. My training wheels were taken off per say.
Once i started going to classes regularly i was able to start mingling with students in a couple classes that i had already talked too. I would be laughing and joking with them inside of the classroom. But, During breaks i would stand around with the inclass friends but wouldnt make much convo with them. During lunch it would be nearly impossible to locate those friends since my school is MASSIVE and would hang out at my older cousins house a five min walk away. I would always put on a smile and try and be “cool” and “fit-in” but sometimes it would be a bunch of horsesh*t tbh.
Once school would end i would have little to no contact with them. Only one group chat for a class that requires a permanent 4 man group for the year. Do keep in mind that i live in another nearby municipality 10 mins away from my school. If anybodys from Vancouver. School is in south-Van and i live in Richmond near the River Rock Casino. But i still feel like i dont hang out with these friends outside if school.
Now, outside of school, i have a dozen “bros” that were made by our parents being great friends. Weekend bbqs, bday parties, NFL sundays, etc. I love these guys to death. Every weekend theres a function that included at least a couple of them and we’d hang out and watch UFC fights or hockey games together. But, inside of school i feel a little lonely. And during the week nobody from that group is avaliable. So i end up just being by myself. Am i overeacting when seeing other students’ snapchat stories and igs with them hanging out with their school friends? Or is it ok to have my friend group outside of school? This would be advice for the next school year as this year is most likely written off due to COVID-19.
submitted by KingKash2003 to teenagers [link] [comments]

I have friends outside of H.S but not inside. Is that ok?

Im in grade 11. During grades 8-10.5 i had severe tourrettes and had to miss a bunch of inclass schooling due to high amounts of stress and anxiety from my tics. I missed a LOT of school and did assignments in the rescource room or at home. Mid-grade 10 i was able to turn things around and become a full-time student not needing the help of support workers. My training wheels were taken off per say.
Once i started going to classes regularly i was able to start mingling with students in a couple classes that i had already talked too. I would be laughing and joking with them inside of the classroom. But, During breaks i would stand around with the inclass friends but wouldnt make much convo with them. During lunch it would be nearly impossible to locate those friends since my school is MASSIVE and would hang out at my older cousins house a five min walk away. I would always put on a smile and try and be “cool” and “fit-in” but sometimes it would be a bunch of horsesh*t tbh.
Once school would end i would have little to no contact with them. Only one group chat for a class that requires a permanent 4 man group for the year. Do keep in mind that i live in another nearby municipality 10 mins away from my school. If anybodys from Vancouver. School is in south-Van and i live in Richmond near the River Rock Casino. But i still feel like i dont hang out with these friends outside if school.
Now, outside of school, i have a dozen “bros” that were made by our parents being great friends. Weekend bbqs, bday parties, NFL sundays, etc. I love these guys to death. Every weekend theres a function that included at least a couple of them and we’d hang out and watch UFC fights or hockey games together. But, inside of school i feel a little lonely. And during the week nobody from that group is avaliable. So i end up just being by myself. Am i overeacting when seeing other students’ snapchat stories and igs with them hanging out with their school friends? Or is it ok to have my friend group outside of school? This would be advice for the next school year as this year is most likely written off due to COVID-19.
submitted by KingKash2003 to Advice [link] [comments]

I have friends outside of H.S but not inside. Is that ok?

Im in grade 11. During grades 8-10.5 i had severe tourrettes and had to miss a bunch of inclass schooling due to high amounts of stress and anxiety from my tics. I missed a LOT of school and did assignments in the rescource room or at home. Mid-grade 10 i was able to turn things around and become a full-time student not needing the help of support workers. My training wheels were taken off per say.
Once i started going to classes regularly i was able to start mingling with students in a couple classes that i had already talked too. I would be laughing and joking with them inside of the classroom. But, During breaks i would stand around with the inclass friends but wouldnt make much convo with them. During lunch it would be nearly impossible to locate those friends since my school is MASSIVE and would hang out at my older cousins house a five min walk away. I would always put on a smile and try and be “cool” and “fit-in” but sometimes it would be a bunch of horsesh*t tbh.
Once school would end i would have little to no contact with them. Only one group chat for a class that requires a permanent 4 man group for the year. Do keep in mind that i live in another nearby municipality 10 mins away from my school. If anybodys from Vancouver. School is in south-Van and i live in Richmond near the River Rock Casino. But i still feel like i dont hang out with these friends outside if school.
Now, outside of school, i have a dozen “bros” that were made by our parents being great friends. Weekend bbqs, bday parties, NFL sundays, etc. I love these guys to death. Every weekend theres a function that included at least a couple of them and we’d hang out and watch UFC fights or hockey games together. But, inside of school i feel a little lonely. Am i overeacting when seeing other students’ snapchat stories and igs with them hanging out with their school friends? Or is it ok to have my solid friend group outside of school? This would be advice for the next school year as this year is most likely written off due to COVID-19.
submitted by KingKash2003 to Advice [link] [comments]

I have friends outside of H.S but not inside. Is that ok?

First post, here it goes...
Im in grade 11. During grades 8-10.5 i had severe tourrettes and had to miss a bunch of inclass schooling due to high amounts of stress and anxiety from my tics. I missed a LOT of school and did assignments in the rescource room or at home. Mid-grade 10 i was able to turn things around and become a full-time student not needing the help of support workers. My training wheels were taken off per say.
Once i started going to classes regularly i was able to start mingling with students in a couple classes that i had already talked too. I would be laughing and joking with them inside of the classroom. But, During breaks i would stand around with the inclass friends but wouldnt make much convo with them. During lunch it would be nearly impossible to locate those friends since my school is MASSIVE and would hang out at my older cousins house a five min walk away. I would always put on a smile and try and be “cool” and “fit-in” but sometimes it would be a bunch of horsesh*t tbh.
Once school would end i would have little to no contact with them. Only one group chat for a class that requires a permanent 4 man group for the year. Do keep in mind that i live in another nearby municipality 10 mins away from my school. If anybodys from Vancouver. School is in south-Van and i live in Richmond near the River Rock Casino. But i still feel like i dont hang out with these friends outside if school.
Now, outside of school, i have a dozen “bros” that were made by our parents being great friends. Weekend bbqs, bday parties, NFL sundays, etc. I love these guys to death. Every weekend theres a function that included at least a couple of them and we’d hang out and watch UFC fights or hockey games together. But, inside of school i feel a little lonely. Am i overeacting when seeing other students’ snapchat stories and igs with them hanging out with their school friends? Or is it ok to have my solid friend group outside of school? This would be advice for the next school year as this year is most likely written off due to COVID-19.
submitted by KingKash2003 to Advice [link] [comments]

The HUGE Significance of 11/14 or 11/5

After my last post about Regulus and bringing up the Nov 14th date spoken about in the Trackdown - End of the World Episode again, I started doing some more digging. It's important you read that post before you can understand this one. You can find it here.

The name of the asteroid that occulted the star Regulus for 14 seconds on March 20, 2014 was called 163 Erigone.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/163_Erigone
163 Erigone is an asteroid from the asteroid belt and the namesake of the Erigone family of asteroids that share similar orbital elements and properties. It was discovered by French astronomer Henri Joseph Perrotin on April 26, 1876, and named after one of the two Erigones in Greek mythology.
Erigone is a relatively large and dark asteroid with an estimated size of 73 km. Based upon its spectrum, it is classified as a C-type asteroid, which indicates that it probably has a carbonaceous composition.
2014 occultation of Regulus
In the early morning hours of March 20, 2014, Erigone occulted the first-magnitude star Regulus as first predicted by A. Vitagliano in 2004. This would have been a rare case of an occultation of a very bright star visible from a highly populated area, since the shadow path moved across New York state and Ontario, including all five boroughs of New York City. Observers in the shadow path would have seen the star wink out for as long as 14 seconds.
However, heavy clouds and rain blocked the view for most if not all people on the shadow path. The website of the International Occultation Timing Association does not list any successful observations at all.
Two single chord Asteroid Occultation events have been observed, in 2013 and 2014

The fact that no one actually witnessed it is REALLY interesting and must play some sort of dynamic to all of this.

The name Erigone seems to refer to 2 different Greek goddesses

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erigone_(daughter_of_Icarius))
Icarius was cordial towards Dionysus, who gave his shepherds wine. They became intoxicated and killed Icarius, thinking he had poisoned them. His daughter, Erigone, and her dog, Maera, found his body. Erigone hanged herself over her father's grave. Dionysus was angry and punished Athens by making all of the city's maidens commit suicide in the same way. Erigone was placed in the stars as the constellation Virgo.
According to Ovid, Dionysus "deceived Erigone with false grapes", that is, assumed the shape of a grape cluster to approach and seduce her.

Dionysus was the god of winemaking. He was responsible for the growth of the vines.

John 15
"I am the true vine and my Father is the gardener. 2 He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful."

Sounds like this one is associated with an Antichrist like Figure pretending to be Jesus since wine represents his blood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erigone_(daughter_of_Aegisthus))
Erigone would have been slain by Orestes along with her brother Aletes if not for the intervention of Artemis, who rescued her and made her a priestess in Attica. In some stories, she hangs herself after the child is born, though this may be a confusion with Erigone, daughter of Icarius. Also, after Hermione died, she is said to have married Orestes and gave birth to Penthilus. Or it is said she sued Orestes to murder of her parents.

Orestes murdered his own mother then went crazy. Satan/Yahweh have other gods related to them where they are rejected by their mothers or don't have one, which is why they are narcissists who hate women and why we he kicks Adam and Eve out of the Garden of Eden (Mother Nature) and curses women to be subservient to men (read more about this idea here). Revelation speaks of the Red Dragon trying to kill a newborn baby and the woman who birthed him. She then goes somewhere in the wilderness, where God held a place for her until its time. God in this story apparently, is Artemis or Diana. She's not dead, she's just hiding until Orestes (humanity) attones for what he did. This stuff correlates to so much more, I might have to make another post just about this.

I came across this date (11/14) towards the beginning of my journey and I never went back looking into it because it felt like a dead end besides a couple of VERY key significances. Nov 14th is both the day the "Great Comet" is discovered in 1680 and the day that Einstein presented his Quantum Theory of Light in 1908. Looking at this list now, I see WAY more correlations with this to the point it's getting ridiculous. And it seems this date is a sort of pendulum point in time because we have instances of people winning their freedoms, overtaking governments and rulers being killed and we have instances of enslavement, attacks and new kings getting crowned. I wonder which way Earth is going to go in this timeline. Also important to note 11/14 = 1 + 4 = 5 = 11/5 = 1 + 1 + 5 = 7

"Remember, Remember the 5th of November"

Transitions and Abuses of Power


1380 King Charles VI of France crowned at age 12
1698 Spanish king Carlos appoints grandson prince Jozef Ferdinand as heir
1863 Nathan Bedford Forrest is assigned to command of West Tennessee
1881 Charles J. Guiteau put on trial for the assassination of US President Garfield
1881 Leon Gambetta forms French government
1907 The Third Duma (Parliament) meets in Russia; following Tsar Nicholas II's limiting of the franchise, a conservative majority holds sway and suppresses the radical elements
1908 Liberal candidate Jose Miguel Gomez wins national elections for president in Cuba
1915 Tomáš Masaryk demands independence for Czechoslovakia
1918 Republic of Czechoslovakia created with Tomáš Masaryk as its 1st president
1919 Red Army captures Omsk, Siberia
1920 The Russian Bolshevik army occupies Sebastopol, ending anti-communist attempts to regain the government of Russia
1921 The Communist Party of Spain is founded
1922 German Reichs Chancellor Joseph Wirth's term ends
1935 FDR proclaims Philippine Islands a free commonwealth
1935 Nazis deprive German Jews of their citizenship
1942 Last Vichy-French troops in Algeria surrender
1945 Java: Sutan Sjahrir appointed as forming government
1952 Greek General Alexander Papagos wins elections
1954 Egyptian President Naguib resigns, state of emergency declared
1956 Hungarian revolt put down by Soviet invasion
1957 The Apalachin Meeting outside Binghamton, New York is raided by law enforcement, and many high level Mafia figures are arrested
1965 US government sends 90,000 soldiers to Vietnam
1966 Muhammad Ali TKOs Cleveland Williams in 3 for heavyweight title
1971 Enthronment of Pope Shenouda III as Pope of Alexandria
1980 Guinee-Bissau Premier Vieira fires President Luis Cabral
1984 Zamboanga City mayor Cesar Climaco, a prominent critic of the government of Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos, is assassinated in his home city.
2001 War in Afghanistan: Afghan Northern Alliance fighters takeover the capital Kabul
2017 Armed forces drive through streets of Harare, Zimbabwe a day after military says its prepared to step in after removal of vice-president Emmerson Mnangagwa

1959 "Girls against the Boys" closes at Alvin Theater NYC after 16 performances

This seems to imply we'll be at union with both the masculine and the feminine. But all of these events seem to be polar opposites so who knows. It almost seems like women are going to take over and we're trading places. Like Dumuzid and Inanna. If this is the coming of the True Antichrist, then it won't be good and balance will not be achieved through them.

Disasters and Attacks


1775 -15] Floods ravage Dutch coast provinces
1927 World's largest gas tank in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, explodes; 28 die
1938 Dutch DC3 crashes at Schiphol, 6 die
1939 Oil refinery fire kills 500 & destroys Lagunillas, Venezuela
1940 During WW II, German planes destroy most of Coventry, England
1941 British aircraft carrier Ark Royal sank in Mediterranean, having been torpedoed by a German submarine the day before
1941 Governr-General Wouters of Dutch Antilles refuses Jews refuge
1942 -Nov 15th) Japanese/US sea battle at Savo-Island in Guadalcanal
1946 Dutch Dakota flight to Schiphol crashes, kills 11
1959 Kilauea's most spectacular eruption (in Hawaii)
1960 2 passenger trains collided at high-speed killing 110 (Czech)
1960 Riot due to school integration in New Orleans
1970 Marshall U football team wiped out in DC-9 air crash at Kenova, West Virginia, killing 75
1980 US performs nuclear test at Nevada Test Site
1985 Volcano Nevado del Ruiz Colombia erupts, 1000s killed
1990 France performs nuclear test at Mururoa atoll
1990 Great Britain performs nuclear test at Nevada Test Site
1990 Philippines hit by typhoon, 110 die
2016 7.8 earthquake cuts off town of Kaikoura, New Zealand, raising sea bed by 4m, and killing 2 people


Currency Issues


1931 Ottawa Mint Act is proclaimed in Britain
2002 Argentina defaults on an $805 million World Bank payment.
2008 Italy plunges into recession, its first since the start of 2005, after GDP contracts a steeper-than-expected 0.5% in the third quarter
2008 Hong Kong becomes the second Asian economy to tip into recession, its exports hit by weakening global demand
2008 Eurozone officially slips into recession for the first time since its creation in 1999, pushed down by recessions in Germany and Italy
2008 Elizabeth Warren is appointed to chair a Congressional Oversight Panel for the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act
2009 The National Statistical Service of Greece states that the country has been in recession since the beginning of the year
2012 A series of protests against austerity measures occur across Europe including Spain, Portugal, and Greece


TV Shows/Movies/Plays/Books


1851 "Moby-Dick" by Herman Melville first published by Harper and Brothers in the US
1883 "Treasure Island" by Robert Louis Stevenson is first published as a book by Cassell & Co.
1894 Start of Sherlock Holmes "Adventure of Golden Pince-Nez" (BG)
1905 David Belasco's "Girl of Golden West" premieres in NYC
1908 Oscar Strauss' musical "Der tapfere Soldat" premieres in Vienna
1945 H Lindsay and R Crouse's "State of the Union" premieres in NYC

"The play's events... allude to Wendell Willkie, the utility company head who became the surprise Republican candidate for president in 1940. 'This is a play about a businessman who is a dark-horse candidate.'

1952 First regular UK singles chart published by the New Musical Express
1960 Ray Charles' "Georgia On My Mind" reaches #1

I said Georgia, GeorgiaA song of you (a song of you)Comes as sweet and clearAs moonlight through the pine

1964 "Fade Out-Fade In" closes at Mark Hellinger NYC after 199 performances
The show spoofs some of the great film stars of the era, such as Shirley Temple and Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, and Governor is based on MGM honcho Louis B. Mayer, known for his roving eye for pretty starlets and deep-seated nepotism.

1964 "Folies Bergere" closes at Broadway Theater NYC after 191 performances
1964 "Oliver!" closes at Imperial Theater NYC after 774 performances
A workhouse in Dunstable, England is visited by the wealthy governors who fund it. While a sumptuous banquet is held for them, the barefoot orphan boys who work there are being served their daily gruel. They dream of enjoying the same "Food, Glorious Food" as their masters. While eating, some boys draw straws to see who will ask for more to eat, and the job falls to a boy named Oliver Twist. He goes up to Bumble and Widow Corney, who run the workhouse and serve the gruel, and asks for more. Enraged, Bumble takes Oliver to the governors to see what to do with him ("Oliver!"). A decision is made to have Oliver sold into service. Bumble parades Oliver through the snow, trying to sell him to the highest bidder ("Boy for Sale"). Oliver is sold to an undertaker named Mr. Sowerberry, who intends to use him as a mourner for children's funeral
1965 "Baker Street" closes at Broadway Theater NYC after 313 performances
1965 George Abbott Theater (Adelphi, 54 St) at 152 W 54th NYC, demolished
1968 U.S. premiere of film version of Morris L. West's best seller "The Shoes of the Fisherman"
1973 "Good Evening" opens at Plymouth Theater NYC for 438 performances
1976 "Network", directed by Sidney Lumet, starring Faye Dunaway, Peter Finch and William Holden, premieres in Los Angeles and New York City (Finch - Academy Awards Best Actor 1977)

This one warrants reading the entire plot as it fits too perfectly. Even ending with the assassination of the main character.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_(1976_film))
Network is a 1976 American satirical film written by Paddy Chayefsky and directed by Sidney Lumet, about a fictional television network, UBS, and its struggle with poor ratings
1981 "Raise!" 11th studio album by Earth, Wind & Fire is released (Billboard Album of the Year 1982) Event of interestEvent of Interest
1987 "La Cage aux Folles" closes at Palace Theater NYC after 1761 performances

La cage aux folles literally means "the cage of mad women". However, folles is also a slang term for effeminate homosexuals (queens).

1991 Michael Jackson's "Black or White" video premieres on FOX TV
1993 "Kentucky Cycle" opens at Royale Theater NYC for 34 performances
1993 "Twilight of the Golds" closes at Booth Theater NYC after 29 performances
1993 Puerto Rico votes against becoming the 51st US state
1996 "Chicago" opens at Richard Rodgers Theater NYC
1997 Disney's "Lion King" sets Broadway record of $2,700,000 daily sale
2000 Geddy Lee releases his first solo album, “My Favourite Headache”
2002 Film "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" is released, based on the second book by J. K. Rowling
2006 "Casino Royale", 21st James Bond film premieres in London, starring Daniel Craig for the 1st time and Eva Green, premieres in London
2012 "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2", based on the book by Stephenie Meyer, directed by Bill Condon, starring Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson, is released
As ridiculous as this sounds, this might be the most relevant of all. I can't fit it all here, so just go here and read about the plot.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Twilight_Saga:_Breaking_Dawn_%E2%80%93_Part_2#Plot

Her daughters name literally means "born again". Someone gets told they don't live in the world they think they do. Her child get persecuted and they gather "witnesses" to testify for her. The 2 witnesses in Revelation? The correlations here are crazy. Especially with the idea I've heard that everything man exalts, God hates and vice versa. So Pagan and witches seem to be implying something here.

2016 "Moana" animated Disney film directed by Ron Clements and John Musker with voices by Auli'i Cravalho and Dwayne Johnson premieres in Los Angeles
On the Polynesian island of Motunui, the inhabitants worship the goddess Te Fiti, who brought life to the ocean, using a pounamu stone as her heart and the source of her power. Maui, the shapeshifting demigod and master of sailing, steals the heart to give humanity the power of creation. However, Te Fiti disintegrates, and Maui is attacked by Te Kā, a volcanic demon, losing both his magical giant fishhook and the heart to the depths.
A millennium later, Moana, daughter of Motunui's chief Tui, is chosen by the ocean to return the heart to Te Fiti. However, Tui arrives and takes Moana away, causing her to lose the heart.

Space & Exploration Related


1524 Francisco Pizarro begins his 1st great expedition, near Colombia
1792 Captain George Vancouver is first Englishman to enter San Francisco Bay

Something to do with Pope Francis? Either Jesuit takeover of America or destruction of the Catholic church would be my guess.

1910 1st airplane flight from deck of a ship, Norfolk, Virginia

Another first involving flying vehicles

1922 BBC begins daily radio broadcasts from the 2LO transmitter at Marconi House

Implying contact

1923 Kentaro Suzuki completes his ascent of Mount Iizuna.

1969 Apollo 12 (Conrad/Gordon/Bean) launched for 2nd manned Moon landing

We just announced we're sending people back to the moon

1981 2nd Space Shuttle Mission-Columbia 2-returns to Earth

The 2nd space shuttle, Lady Liberty, RETURNS to Earth

1983 First cruise missile placed at Greenham Common, England

Those missiles were guided by light

1984 Astronauts aboard "Discovery" pluck a 2nd satellite from orbit

More references to a 2nd moon or "satellite". With "Discovery" plucking one from orbit.

1984 NASA launches NATO-3D

Implying this 3D world was "launched" or created?

1994 Space shuttle STS-66 (Atlantis 13), lands

Atlantis? 13 is the mother again.

2012 CFBDSIR 2149-0403 is discovered, the closest rogue planet to earth (100 light-years away)

This is a giant indicator.


Scandals


1550 Pope Julius III proclaims new seat on Council of Trente

Apparently he was fucking his "adopted nephew" which was a big scandal for the Catholic Church

1943 J Postma, C Schalker, D Goulooze arrested for leading illegal CPN

CPN scams involve social security numbers and escaping bad credit.

1991 American and British authorities announce indictments against two Libyan intelligence officials in connection with the downing of the Pan Am Flight 103

Russia downed a flight and I don't think anyone has indicted them yet

1986 SEC imposes a record $100 million penalty against Ivan Boesky

Fined for insider stock trading, the highest fine ever at the time for a single person.

2002 The United States House of Representatives votes not to create an independent commission to investigate the September 11 attacks

Now this is VERY interesting. Trump has repeatedly said he would expose 9/11 and I've had this theory for a while that he would use this information to end the investigation and take complete power.

1976 War criminal Pieter Menten captured 1 day after fleeing

He was a Nazi. A Dutch writer was involved in his capture. I'm noticing a lot of references to the Dutch. Apparently they were very complicit in atrocities of Nazi Germany and they had the highest percentage of Jewish deaths in Western Europe, 75% of them died. A lot of Nazi's actually hid out in these areas to avoid capture. The Little Baron Trump books say he changed his name to a Dutch name. Trump himself lied and said his father was Swedish. I think it's pretty obvious what this means.


Miscellaneous


1666 Samuel Pepys reports on 1st blood transfusion (between dogs)

Almost seems like an illusion to genetic manipulation. The Greeks called the city where they worshiped the Egyptian god of the Underworld Anubis, the "city of the dog". Jesus referred to a Canaanite woman as a dog once. Trump also called Omarosa a "dog". Keeping with my theory that almost 100% of the negative things Trump says about a person are projection, which means he's really talking about himself, this is very interesting. Especially with his love for Black and Gold color schemes on his "Towers" which is very Egyptian. Ramses II also had red hair. Which means he was an Edomite. Ramses II is mentioned specifically on Cleopatra's Needle, one of which is a mile away from the black inverted obelisk that is Trump Tower. Ramses II sounds an AWFUL lot like Trump. Loved to build monuments to himself and over exaggerated his accomplishments. He is very revered though and thought of as a great Pharaoh, according to what was written about him at least.

1675 Pope Clemens X declares Gorcumse martyrs divine

They were 19 Catholics who were killed for being Catholics

1832 First streetcar (horse-drawn) (John Mason) debuts in NYC; fare 12 cents rode on 4th Avenue between Prince and 14th Sts

The Mars Rover was literally just driven around NYC


1896 Power plant at Niagara Falls begins operation

Implying a new power or power source is coming?

1967 The Congress of Colombia in commemoration of the 150 years of the death of Policarpa Salavarrieta, declares this day as "Day of the Colombian Woman"

Columbia was originally a name for the goddess of America, which is essentially Lady Liberty. If the Messiah really is coming, this is implying it's a woman.

1969 2nd Vietnam Moratorium Day in US

This was a sit in to protest the Vietnam war

1972 Dow Jones closes above 1,000 for 1st time (1003.16)

This seems to be a good thing

1973 Canada begins production of Olympic coins

The Olympics was the celebration of the Triumph over the first gods, the Titans. Although its just a sham to fool the people into thinking they are free now when the old gods just changed shape into new ones. Like the Phoenix being reborn.

1975 Spain, Morocco and Mauretania sign accord about Spanish Sahara

Spain gave up land due to pressure from the UN

1976 "Don't Step on My Olive Branch" closes at Playhouse NYC after 16 performances

This is a play about Israel. Olive branches represent peace

1977 Egyptian President Anwar Sadat repeats willingness to visit Israel to Walter Cronkite

Interesting. Egypt is a metaphor in the Bible for a place of struggle as well as being a real place.

1981 Old Dutch Windmill in Golden Gate Park repaired and working again

Apparently this is just one of 2 different ones. The other one called Murphy which is on the west side of the GOLDEN GATE Park.

1982 Polish Solidarity chairman Lech Wałęsa freed

Just gonna have to read about this one for yourselves, it's very relevant.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lech_Wa%C5%82%C4%99sa

1990 Michael Heseltine contests Margaret Thatcher's leadership of the British Conservative Party

A challenge to the conservative party

1991 Cambodian Prince Norodom Sihanouk returns to Phnom Penh after thirteen years of exile

13 is associated with the mother principal of the soul. She's been in exile, represented by getting kicked out of the Garden of Eden.

2001 OPEC announces that it intends to cut its crude oil output quotas by 1.5 million barrels per day effective, but only if non-OPEC producers cut their output by 500,000 barrels per day as well

Oil shortage coming?

2007 the last direct-current distribution by Con Edison was shut down.

Is this indicating the power will be cut off or is it a metaphor for humanity itself?

Children's Day is celebrated on the 14th of November in India as a tribute to Jawaharlal Nehru, who was born on November 14, 1889. Jawaharlal Nehru, who was fondly called Chacha Nehru or simply Chachaji, was known for his love for children. On this day, chocolates and gifts are often distributed among children, while schools organize different events such as debates, and music and dance performances. It is also a common practice to distribute gifts like clothes, toys and books to orphan children on this day.
submitted by Oblique9043 to TheGreatDeception [link] [comments]

Burnout Paradise - Where the developers are now

With the remaster of Burnout Paradise release soon and worked on by Criterion and Stellar Entertainment (see Paul Ross for details on that company) I thought it might be fun to make a thread and track down the devs. If you want some additional reading about Burnout, Three Fields released a history about how it started in January.
For a quick summary, Criterion was originally a 3d graphics rendering technology company owned by Canon. It was spun out and became the “modern” Criterion Games in 1999/2000. In 2004 it was purchased by EA.
Most info/quotes are from company websites and LinkedIn. Now, this thread is long enough already, so let’s get started (this thread is long enough that I’ll have to go into the comments to finish the thread.
Fiona Sperry worked as EA Criterion Studio GM. Sperry helped form the modern Criterion Games and previously worked at McGraw-Hill. In 2014 she left and co-founded Three Fields Entertainment.
Alex Ward worked as creative director. Ward helped form the modern Criterion Games and previously worked at Acclaim. He continued to work at Criterion until 2014 (including a unreleased game codenamed “Adventure”) when he co-founded Three Fields Entertainment.
Peter Hawley worked as executive producer. Hawley previously worked at companies including Lionhead (where he was one of the first employees) and Sony. He joined Criterion in late 2005 and in 2009 became vice president of product development at EA. In 2010 he joined Crowdstar before co-founding Red Robot Labs in 2011, where he worked at CPO and later CEO until 2014. He next joined Zynga before coming CEO of Telltale Games in September 2017.
Craig Sullivan worked as lead designer. Sullivan joined Criterion in 1997 and was the first game designer for the studio. He previously worked at Millenium Interactive as a designetester. In 2009 he became creative director at the company before joining Ghost Games in 2013. Sullivan left Ghost Games at the end of 2016, and in May 2017 joined Amazon.
Jon Lawrence worked as senior development director. Lawrence joined EA in 1998 and worked on series including Harry Potter, F1 and Black. In 2012 Lawrence left to work at Sky before returning to EA shortly in 2013. Later that year Lawrence joined Microsoft as development director, and worked on Warface. In 2015 he joined Natural Motion before joining Digit Game Studios in 2017 as director of production.
Steve Uphill worked as art director. Uphill previously worked at Kuju Entertainment before joining Criterion in 2002. In 2008 Uphill left Criterion and joined Black Rock Studio to work as art director on Split/Second. In 2011 he co-founded ShortRound Games where he worked as art director. In 2016 Uphill returned to Criterion and is currently studio art director.
Stephen Root worked as audio director. Root worked at Acclaim for five years as head of audio before joining Criterion in 2000. In 2008 Root left Criterion and joined Codemasters, where he is currently VP of development creative services.
Olly Read worked as a technical director. Read joined Criterion in 1999 and worked at the company until 2011. In 2012 Read started work as a “game programming ninja” at Escapist Games.
Paul Ross worked as a technical director. Ross joined Criterion in 1996 and worked as CTO before leaving in 2014. He next worked at Three Fields Entertainment before leaving in 2016. Ross next founded Stellar Entertainment in 2016, which is making Burnout Paradise Remastered.
Pete Lake worked as a producer. Lake worked as an artist for early Criterion games before starting production on Paradise. In 2010 Lake worked as a producer for Harry Potter and The Sims. In 2013 he returned to Criterion.
San Shepherd worked as a producer. Shepherd previously worked at EA and Pyro Studios before rejoining EA in 2006. Near the end of 2008 Shepherd left and in 2009 joined Zero Point Software as a board member. At the same time, Shepherd co-founded Escapist Games and became director for European Construction Company. Since 1990 Shepherd has also been director of Citilet Booking, and in 1997 founded The Copenhagen Post, where he worked as CEO for five years. He also produced weekly music shows for Danish TV in the 90s.
Matt Webster worked as a producer. Webster joined EA in 1990 and worked on games including Syndicate, Theme Park and Populous II. He also created the initial concept for the first Fifa game and associate produced the game. After EA purchased Criterion Webster joined the company as producer. In 2013 he became GM of Criterion.
Hamish Young worked as a producer. Young joined Criterion in 1999 and had worked as a technical director and a lead programmer on previous Burnout games. Young continued to work at Criterion until 2013, when he joined Avalanche Studios (for quick reference this is the Just Cause studio, not the Disney Infinity one) where he works as a designer.
Steve Cuss worked as a development manager. Cuss worked at IBM and Intelligent Games before joining EA in 2003. Since 2005 Cuss has worked as a producer for Criterion.
Helen King worked as a development manager. King joined Criterion in 2006 but left in 2009 and joined Codemasters, where they worked on Bodycount. After leaving in 2011 King joined Deepmind in 2012, which was later bought by Google.
Radek Majder worked as a development manager. Majder previously worked at companies like Plastic Wax, Forte Studios and Perception before joining EA in 2006. Majder worked as development director at EA until 2013. In 2014 they joined BBC where they worked until 2017. They are currently head of development management at Mclaren Applied Technology.
Alan McDairmant worked as a development manager. McDairmant previously worked at Inner Workings, Data Design & Artwork, Red Lemon Studios and Visual Science before joining Criterion in 2005. McDairmant continues to work at EA/Criterion and most recently has worked as a director of product development/studio leadership on games such as Battlefront 2, Battlefield 1 and Need for Speed.
Dan McDonald worked as a development manager. McDonald previously worked in QA on series like Burnout, Harry Potter and Populous. McDonald did interviews for Burnout Crash and seemingly left Criterion afterwards. He was credited as a production manager for Until Dawn in 2015.
Sheri Patterson worked as a development manager. Patterson previously worked at Pixar (on the Incredibles, Finding Nemo and Boundin’), Blue Sky and Charlex before joining Criterion in 2006. In 2008 she left and worked as a producer for various companies including DreamWorks and Disney (on Frozen). Patterson also worked with companies including Apple, Google and Land Rover.
Cath Schell worked as production coordinator. Schell first appeared in Criterion credits in 2002, and is still with the company. She posts a lot of mushrooms.
Charnjit Bansi worked as a designer. Bansi previously worked at Codemasters before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2009 Bansi joined Bizarre Creations as a/the game director (Activision doesn’t tend to give detailed credits so I can’t tell if Bansi was the only person with the role). After consulting for a month in 2011 at Neversoft Bansi joined Sledgehammer Games as a/the development director.
Richard Bunn worked as a designer. Bunn previously worked in QA at Sony and as a level designer at Argonaut before joining Criterion in 2004. Bunn worked on the design of the “open-world traffic system, vehicle A.I. behaviours and the Crash Mode gameplay,” for the game. After leaving Criterion in 2007 Bunn rejoined Sony where he worked for three years on the original version of Until Dawn and the canceled Eight Days. After leaving in 2011, Bunn has worked at Mindshapes, Nice Touch and most recently Aceviral.
Matt Follett worked as a designer. Follett joined EA in 1999 working in QA and design. He joined Criterion in 2008 after working on previous Burnout games, and worked on algorithms and scripting for Paradise along with the PC version. Follett later became a lead at Criterion before leaving in 2014. Since then he has worked for Boss Alien.
Paul Glancey worked as a designer. Glancey previously worked as an editor for games magazines in the late 80s/early 90s before joining Eidos in 1998. He joined EA in 2000 before leaving in 2008. He next worked as design director on Split/Second before joining Ubisoft in 2010. In 2012 Glancey returned to Criterion.
Tommy Hudson worked as a designer. Hudson joined Criterion in 2005 and worked at the company until the end of 2010. Hudson next joined DICE where they worked on Battlefield. In 2013 Hudson joined Remedy and worked on Quantum Break. They are currently lead designer on a new game at Remedy.
Oliver Reid-Smith worked as a designer. Reid-Smith joined Criterion in 2004 before leaving in 2010. They worked as a lead designer on Split/Second before becoming a freelance consultant in 2012. Reid-Smith has worked on games including The Room, Disney Infinity and Blackwood Crossing.
Steve Watt worked as a designer. Watt joined EA in 2004 and worked as lead online designer. In 2008 Watt left and joined Codemasters where they worked as lead designer. After the closure of the Guildford studio in 2011, Watt did some freelance in 2012. Later that year, Watt joined Microsoft.
Ben Earnshaw worked as a level designer. Earnshaw worked on AI and planned race routes for the game, before leaving at the end of 2007. He next joined Dark Energy Digital as a designer on Hydrophobia. In 2010 Earnshaw left the gaming industry and joined his family’s woodworking company.
Mata Haggis worked as a level designer. Haggis previously worked at Channel 4 and MTV before joining Criterion for 2007. Haggis worked on building the world and make it seem believable. In 2008 he joined Rebellion where he worked as a designer on Alien vs Predator and PDC World Championship Darts Pro Tour. After leaving Rebellion in 2010 Haggis lectured at NHTV for five years before becoming a professor. From 2013 to 2016 he worked with Sassybot freelance, and since 2000 has worked as a game designer with Matazone.
Dave Sage worked as a level designer. Sage joined Criterion in 2007 after short work lecturing. In 2008 Sage left and joined Codemasters, where he worked until 2011. Since then Sage has worked for various groups teaching, and currently is general manager of a cafe/bicycling company.
Jason RM Smith worked as associate CG supervisor. Smith joined EA in 1998 and worked at Bullfrog and EA UK before joining Criterion. At the end of 2007 Smith left and joined Lucasarts where he worked on The Force Unleashed, 1313 and other games. When Lucasarts closed Smith co-founded Soma Play where he worked until 2017. He currently is a creative consultant.
Richard Franke worked as a lead artist. Franke worked as an artist for Scavenger and Mucky Foot before joining EA in 2002. At the end of year Franke joined Criterion, where he worked until 2012. After leaving Franke founded Magic Notion where he has made games and worked as a contract artist for Media Molecule.
Mark Hamilton worked as a lead artist. In 2008 Hamilton left Criterion and co-founded Fireproof Games.
John Lewis worked as a lead artist. Lewis worked as an artist at ICE, DA Group and Bits Studios before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2012 Lewis left and joined Codemasters. Lewis is currently art director at the studio.
James Lipscomb worked as a lead artist. Lipscomb worked at Line One, Red Hot Chilli and Orange Crush before joining EA in 2002. In 2009 Lipscomb left and joined Disney where he worked on Split/Second. At the end of 2011 Lipscomb joined Lucasarts where he worked until the company’s closure. After that he worked at Rumble, Gaia Interactive and Linekong working in UI and UX. He is currently director of UX at pocket gems.
Neil Manners worked as a lead artist. Manners seems to have joined Criterion in the mid-90s. He seems to still be at EA, last working as a senior animator on Need for Speed Payback.
Barry Meade worked as a lead artist. Meade joined the studio in 2003 after working at PCSL, Bullfrog, Scavenger, Negative Productions, Mucky Foot and Iguana. Meade worked mostly on the lighting for Paradise. In 2008 Meade left Criterion and helped found Fireproof Games, where he currently works.
Yuta Nakamura worked as a lead artist. Nakamura worked for Video Systems before joining EA in 2001. Nakamura went on to work as a art director on Need for Speed games before joining DICE in 2016.
David Rack worked as a lead artist. Rack joined Criterion in 2003 and worked at Criterion until 2008. After leaving Rack co-founded Fireproof Games, where he is currently a lead artist.
Damien Rayfield worked as a lead artist. Rayfield worked at Rebellion before joining Criterion in 2004. In 2008 Rayfield left and co-founded Fireproof Games.
Roger Schembri worked as a lead artist. Schembri worked as a graphic designer before joining Criterion in 2004. Schembri worked on UI before leaving in 2008 to work as a lead UI artist at Codemasters. At the end of 2010 Schembri left and joined Fireproof Games.
Chris Cannon worked as an artist. Cannon joined Criterion in 2005 after animating and storyboarding for various companies. In 2008 Cannon left and co-founded Fireproof Games, where he is a lead designer.
Max Cant worked as an artist. Cant joined Criterion in 2005 and worked as an environmental lead. In 2008 Cant left and joined Codemasters as an art director. After leaving Codemasters in 2011, Cant worked for six months at both Koyoki and Vatra Games. At the end of 2012 Cant joined Deepmind, which was later bought by Google.
Tony Cartwright worked as an artist. Cartwright “worked for a several game companies, some that he would prefer not to mention, working on titles that he’d also prefer not to mention.” (mostly movie tie-ins) before joining Criterion. In 2008 Cartwright left and co-founded Fireproof Games, where he is currently a lead artist.
Ingmar Clarysse worked as an artist. Clarysse worked at Larian and Argonaut before joining EA in 2004 as a VFX artist. In 2008 Clarysse left and joined Rocksteady Games, where he works as lead on VFX on the Arkham series.
Will Evans worked as an artist. Evans worked at Teletext before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2009 Evans joined Codemasters before joining Supermassive Games in 2010. After leaving in 2014 and working for 9 months at Rodeo Games, Evans co-founded Playsport Games in 2015.
Dave Flynn worked as an artist. Flynn joined the games industry in 1991 working at Storm Education Software. Flynn also worked at Oregan Software, The Automotive Association and Interactive Studios/Blitz Games (including work on Glover) as well as co-founding Paradise Games. In 2003 Flynn joined Criterion before leaving in 2008 and joining Slightly Mad Studios.
Nicole Gabriel worked as an artist. Gabriel worked as a 3D modeler for various architecture groups before joining EA in 2005. Gabriel worked on the art for Paradise City before leaving in 2009 to work as a freelance artist.
Derek Germain worked as an artist. Germain worked at Bits Studio before joining EA in 2005 as an environmental artist. In 2009 Germain left before joining Slightly Mad Studios as a snr artist. In 2011 Germain left and joined FIreproof Games, where he is a senior artist.
Jack Griffin worked as an artist. Griffin joined Criterion in 2005 before moving into management in 2012. Griffin is currently development direction at the company.
Ben Hall worked as an artist. Hall joined Criterion in 2005. On Paradise he worked on vehicles and later the environment. Hall moved into world design for later Criterion games before becoming lead. In 2013 Hall moved to Ghost Games for five months before working on Battlefield Hardline as an artist for seven months. In 2014 Hall joined Ubisoft where he worked as a level designer on Assassin’s Creed Syndicate. He is currently working as world director on an unannounced game from Ubisoft Quebec.
James Hans worked as an artist. Hans ran Infinite Detail before joining Criterion in 2001. In 2011 Hans became a producer at Criterion before leaving in 2014. Since leaving, Hans has worked as an artist/producer at Natural Motion.
Scott Harber worked as an artist. Harber joined Criterion in 2003 and worked as a technical artist on Paradise. In 2013 Harber worked for a year as technical art director on an unannounced EA game before working on Battlefield Hardline. In 2014 Harber left and started Sc0tt Games which he ran for a year before joining Natural Motion as lead technical artist.
Young Jin Park worked as an artist. I’m unable to find additional information about what Park did (they are credited on Black and Burnout Dominator, but their Mobygames page is mixed with another person with the same name).
Jin Jung worked as an artist. They were last credited with Hot Pursuit, but I’m unable to find any additional information.
Quyen Lam worked as an artist. Lam worked shortly at La Paraguas and Axis Animation before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2008 Lam left and joined Ubisoft, where he worked on Driver: San Francisco. After a short three months at Slightly Mad, Lam joined Rockstar as an environmental artist in 2010.
Kwok Law worked as an artist. Law previously worked on films and television like Harry Potter before joining Criterion in 2005 as a level artist. In 2008 Law left and joined Doublesix Games, where he was a seniolead artist. In 2012 Law left and joined Born Ready before joining Digicub nine months later. In 2013 he co-founded Polynation Games until 2016, when he founded Massive Kwok.
Steve Leney worked as an artist. Leney worked at Mindscape for most of the 90s before joining EA in 1998. In 2008 Leney left and joined Relentless Software, where he worked until 2016. Since leaving Leney has worked as an artist at Make Real.
Mikael Mettania worked as an artist. Mettania worked at Atari and Eutechnyx before joining Criterion in 2005. He worked as a senior vehicle artist on Paradise and a world artist on the DLC. In 2013 Mettania moved over to Ghost Games for seven months before joining Natural Motion as art director in 2014.
Lyndon Munt worked as an artist. In college, Munt worked on Driv3r before joining Criterion in 2004. In 2010 Munt left and joined Fireproof Games, where he is currently a senior artist.
Ben Murch worked as an artist. Murch previously worked at Rebellion before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2007 Murch left and joined Codemasters as a senior artist. In 2010 Murch co-founded Rodeo Games. In 2016 he co-founded Perchang.
Adriaan Pottas worked as an artist. Pottas previously worked at Three Blind Mice and Indestructible Productions before joining EA in 2005. In 2009 Pottas left and worked for a year at Ignition London as a senior artist. Since 2010 Pottas has lectured at Southampton Solent University.
Richard Thomassen worked as an artist. Thomassen worked at Psygnosis for a year before joining Criterion in 1998. In 2013 Thomassen moved to Ghost Games before returning to Criterion the following year.
Marcus Wainwright worked as an artist. Wainwright worked for a year at Rebellion and joined Criterion in 2005. At the end of 2008 Wainwright left and soon joined Codemasters, where he worked until the start of 2012. After a year at Climax Wainwright joined Deepmind in 2013, and is currently a senior technical artist.
Chris Walley worked as an artist. Walley previously worked at Revolution Software before joining Criterion in 2001. On Paradise Walley was lead previs artist. In 2008 Walley left and became director at Escapist Games.
Sam White worked as an artist. White joined EA in 2005 and worked as a graphic designer and GUI artist. In 2009 White left and joined Supermassive Games as an interface artist. In 2015 White left and became director at Playsport Games.
Iain Angus worked as a lead programmer. Angus was an intern at APR Smartlogik before joining Criterion in 2002. In 2011 Angus left and joined VLI before joining Konami in 2013. In 2015 he joined Lionhead until its closure in 2016. He currently works as a development manager at Creative Assembly.
Chris Cummings worked as a lead programmer. Cummings previously worked at Eutechnyx before joining Criterion in 2004. In 2009 he left and joined joined Media Molecule. In 2015 Cummings spent a year at Hello Games working as a programmer on No Man’s Sky before joining Happy Robot Games and Future Tech Labs in 2016.
Alex Fry worked as a lead programmer. Fry joined Criterion after college and worked on rendering. Sometime in the last few years Fry moved over to EA Guildford and currently works on rendering for Frostbite. If you want to learn more, Fry did an interview with EA
Andy Hubbard worked as a lead programmer. Hubbard joined Criterion in 2004 working on physics. In 2008 Hubbard joined Black Rock Studios to work on Split/Second before becoming director of ShortRound in 2011.
Mark Huntley worked as a lead programmer. Huntley worked at Bullfrog from 1993 to 2000 before joining EA. After some Harry Potter games Huntley worked on Paradise. At the end of 2010 he left EA and in 2011 joined Codemasters as a lead programmetechnical director on for online. In 2013 he moved to Lionhead where he worked until the company’s closure. Since then he has worked as a technical program manager at Highlight - See Clearly.
Steve Lucas worked as a lead programmer. Lucas worked at IBM for around a year before joining Criterion in 1998. In 2013 Lucas moved to Canada and became a technical director at EA.
Toby Nelson worked as a lead programmer. I’m unable to find out much info about Nelson. Their first game as part of Criterion was AirBlade and they directed Burnout Crash.
Tad Swift worked as a lead programmer. Swift worked for about a decade in programming/consultation before studying games programming in 2003 and 2004. Swift joined Criterion in 2005 as a junior programmer before becoming lead VFX programmer for Black and Paradise. Swift next went into core engine technologies before leaving in 2013 to join Lionhead. Swift worked as a lead programmer for Fable Legends before joining the Microsoft Advanced Technology Group as a senior software engineer.
Rajan Tande worked as a lead programmer. Tande joined EA in 1996 and in 1999 became a lead programmer. After two years as technical director for Harry Potter, Tande joined the Burnout team in 2006. After Paradise, Tande moved over to EA Bright Light where he worked until its closure in late 2011. He next moved to Maxis Emeryville in California where he worked until its closure in 2015. Since then, he has been CTO at Magic Fuel Games.
John Twigg worked as a lead programmer. Twigg previously worked at EA Black Box before joining Criterion in 2006. Twigg led the design of the audio software for Paradise before leaving in 2008 to joining BNP Paribas. In 2010 he co-founded Crankcase Audio and has worked for a year or so at companies including United Front Games, Snowball (which he co-founded) and Credit Karma.
David Addis worked as a programmer. Addis worked at Codemasters for a year before joining EA in 2005. On Paradise Addis worked on the HUD and refactoring the system. In 2008 he left and joined Lionhead where he worked until 2012. Since 2013 he has worked as lead UI programmer at Natural Motion. Since 2010 he has also run ESP Games.
Mark Baker worked as a programmer. Baker worked at Sony, Metrowerks, Mucky Foot and Climax before joining Criterion in 2005. Baker worked on tools and workflow for Paradise before leaving in 2008 and joining NCSoft for five months. Later in 2008 he joined Black Rock Studio and worked as a lead programmer on Split/Second. In 2011 Baker joined Mind Candy before returning to EA in 2015 as a technical director for development release engineering.
Peter Bliss worked as a programmer. I’m unable to find much information about Bliss but they seem to still be at Criterion.
Garry Casey worked as a programmer. Casey joined Criterion in 2006. At some point Casey moved over to Ghost Games and last worked as online lead on Need for Speed Payback.
Rob Cowsill worked as a programmer. I’m unable to find much information about Cowsill but it seems like they joined Rebellion in 2009 any maybe currently works at Force Field.
Ken Cropper worked as a programmer. Cropper is still at Criterion, and is currently director of engineering.
Antony Crowther worked as a programmer. Crowther joined the games industry in 1983 and worked at Aligata Software, Mirror Soft, Mindscape, Gremlin Interactive, Infogrames and Genepool before joining EA in 2004. In 2006 Crowther moved to Criterion for a year before returning to EA. Since 2011 Crowther has worked as a technical consultant at Sumo Digital.
Graham Daniell worked as a programmer. I was unable to find much information about Daniell but they seem to be at Rocksteady.
Robert Dodd worked as a programmer. Dodd previously worked at Codemasters before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2008 Dodd joined Supermassive before becoming technical director at Fireproof Games in 2011.
Jon Evripiotis worked as a programmer. Evripiotis worked at Travellers Tales before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2008 he joined Bloomberg as a software engineer.
Martiño Figueroa worked as a programmer. Figueroa joined Criterion in 2005 and worked as an AI and gameplay programmer for Paradise. In 2011 Figueroa left and worked at The Foundry for 10 months before co-founding and becoming director of JFDP Labs in 2012. Since 2015 Figueroa has been director of Madruga Works which released Planetbase.
Rich Geldard worked as a programmer. Geldard joined Criterion in in 2005 and is still with the company as technical director.
Joseph Goodwin worked as a programmer. Goodwin joined Criterion in 2006 and worked on tools, UI and localization for Paradise. Goodwin is still at Criterion as a software engineer.
André Jacobs worked as a programmer. Jacobs previously worked at Fifth Dimensional Technologies, Adreniware, I-Imagine and Climax before joining Criterion in 2006. Jacobs worked on the traffic system for Paradise which was later used in Criterion Need for Speed games. In 2008 he joined Lionhead before joining Bloomberg in 2010. In 2012 Jacobs became lead programmer at Medopad before leaving in 2015 and working a year at ICSA. Since 2010 he has also run Voxel Beast.
Matthew Jones worked as a programmer. Jones previously worked at Terabyte and Infogrames/Atari before joining Criterion in 2006. In 2013 Jones left Criterion and worked JFDP Labs on contract while being self employed. In 2015 he joined Microsoft as a senior software engineer in rendering.
Ian Lambert worked as a programmer. Lambert is still part of Criterion and works on UI and UX.
Ling Lo worked as a programmer. Lo worked out Logica, Coment, Argonaut and Symbian before joining EA in 2005. Lo worked on tools and build for Paradise before moving to Vancouver in 2008 to work with EA Black Box. In 2012 Lo moved to Burnaby and has worked as lead online engineer for the Garden Warfare series.
Phil Maguire worked as a programmer. Maguire joined Criterion in 2005 and worked on Freeburn Challenges, Mugshots and Road Rules for Paradise. After working on autolog and multiplayer for Need for Speed games Maguire because technical director of Criterion in 2013. In 2014 he left and help found Three Fields Entertainment.
Alex Mole worked as a programmer. Mole joined Criterion in 2005 and was lead online programmer for autolog. Mole is currently technical director of Criterion. In 2016 Mole gave a talk at GDC.
Robert Perren worked as a programmer. Perren joined Criterion in 2005 before becoming lead tools and workflow programmer in 2012 at Criterion/Ghost Games. In 2014 he left EA and became technical manager at Falmouth University.
Davide Pirola worked as a programmer. Pirola previously worked at companies including Psygnosis, Steel Monkeys and Kuju Entertainment before joining Criterion in 2005. As part of Criterion, Pirola was the self-described “lowest ranked programmer ever.” Here is Pirola’s description of working at Criterion unedited: “My main duty was playing foosball at their mega bar and basically trying to do as little as possible! I mostly succeeded for almost 5 years, my contribution to their games was very minimal, in fact the worst part of every game they made was probably my code, specially crafted in such a way that was a mess to understand and run, credits go where credits due people… I once tried to write some proper code, I remember, it was a Thursday morning, but then I've changed my mind.” Pirola left in 2010 and is currently “Le Grande Fromage” at JFDP labs.
Gavin Rouse worked as a programmer. Rouse joined Criterion in 2002 and seems to now be at Ghost Games as a senior software engineer.
Andrei Shires worked as a programmer. Shires is still at Criterion and seems to work on front end and UI.
Dave Smeathers worked as a programmer. Smeathers joined Criterion in 2006 after being “forced into making video games to pay off his online poker debts.” On Paradise Smeathers worked on coding physics and coding crashes. Smeathers later became physics lead on Need for Speed Most Wanted before leaving Criterion in 2013 to join Fireproof Games.
James Smith worked as a programmer. Smith worked at Mentor Graphics before joining Criterion in 2003 as an audio programmer. Smith became lead audio programmer before leaving Criterion in 2007 and moving to Canada to work at Black Box. In 2012 he left and joined The Coalition, where he is lead audio programmer.
David Steptoe worked as a programmer. Steptoe joined Criterion in 2002 and later became lead audio programmer. In 2013 he left and joined Escapist Games, before leaving at the end of the year. In 2014 he joined Lionhead where he worked until its closure. Steptoe currently runs Audio Software Development, which he formed in 2016.
Alex Thomson worked as a programmer. Thomson previously worked at Rebellion, Elixir and Kuju before joining Criterion in 2006 as a senior software engineer. He has worked as a technical director and lead software engineer in his time at Criterion.
Alex Veal worked as a programmer. Veal joined Criterion in 2006 as an online software engineer. In 2014 he left Criterion and helped start Three Fields Entertainment
James Warren worked as a programmer. Warren joined Criterion in 2005 as an audio programmer. He currently seems to be at Ghost Games and is audio lead.
Tom Williamson worked as a programmer. Williamson previously worked at The Marketing Bureau before joining Criterion in 1999 as a software engineer. In 2011 he left Criterion and the following year became director at JFDP Labs, where he worked until 2017. In 2012 he also started a company called Threeshinyapples Limited.
Ben Woodhouse worked as a programmer. Woodhouse joined Criterion in 2005 as a graphics programmer. On the Paradise engine, Woodhouse worked on “lighting, shadows, occlusion culling, frustum culling, scene management, and various low-level CPU/SPU jobs used in the rendering pipeline.” At the end of 2009 he left Criterion and joined Lionhead as lead engine programmer. After the closure of Lionhead, he joined Epic where he is currently lead console programmer.
Chris Hegstrom worked as audio lead. Hegstrom previously worked at Stormfront Studios and Lucasarts before joining Criterion in 2005. At the end of 2007 Hegstrom left and joined Sony where he worked on God of War. In 2010 he joined Microsoft as audio director before leaving in 2015 and starting Symmetry Audio. In 2016 he joined Technicolor before joining Amazon in September 2017.
Steve Emney worked as an audio designer. Emney was previously self employed before joining Criterion in 2004. He became audio director at Criterion before joining Disney to work on Split/Second in 2009. After the closure of Black Rock Emney became director of TRC Family Entertainment in 2012 where he worked until 2014. Since 2014 he has worked for eMotion in Sound and since 2015 has worked for The Trailerfarm.
Lewis James worked as an audio designer. James joined Criterion in 2005. In 2008 he moved to EA Montreal until 2011, when he moved to Guerrilla Games. At the end of 2013 he left and became director of Improbable until 2015, when he joined La Indiana Sound.
Zsolt Marx worked as an audio designer. Marx previously worked at Rockstar Vienna before joining Criterion in 2005. In 2008 he started to work on other EA games before leaving the company in 2010 after working on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. Since 2012 he has worked as a producer and lead programmer at Noizoo Games.
Thomas Belmont worked as an additional producer. Belmont previously worked at Ubisoft (first in QA and later as a designer and producer) and Eliad Technologies before joining Criterion in 2006. In 2011 he moved to Vancouver to work on other EA games before leaving in 2014 and becoming a producer for online technologies at Ubisoft.
Nick Channon worked as an additional producer. Channon joined EA in 1996 in Vancouver before moving to the UK in 2000 and joining Criterion in 2006. In 2008 he moved back to Vancouver and is currently senior director of business development at EA.
Neil Kaminski worked as an additional producer. Kaminski previously worked at companies including Bullfrog, Pure and Argonaut before joining Criterion in 2005 as a lead artist. In 2006 he became a producer before leaving in 2008 to become studio art manager at Codemasters in 2008. In 2011 he left and joined Escapist Games before joining Pixel Heroes in 2013. After leaving in 2016, he joined CCP in 2017.
Emily Newton Dunn worked as an additional producer. Dunn previously worked in PR for various companies before joining Criterion in 2005 as a producer. In 2007 Dunn moved to EA and became a game designer before becoming lead game designer at Playfish in 2011. In 2013 she left and after being after a few companies for a few months Dunn joined Another Place in 2014. In 2017 she left and after seven months at Playdiation joined Media Molecule in January 2018 as a consultant system designer.
Anja Haman worked on additional support. Haman previously worked at Radical before joining EA in 2005. In 2007 she left before joining Black Box in 2009-2011. From 2012-2015 Haman worked at Work at Play and has been part of Microsoft since the end of 2017. Since 2000 she has worked as president of Haman Consulting.
Maëlenn Lumineau worked on additional support. Lumineau worked as a translator before joining EA in 2000. In 2007 she joined Criterion as as operations manager before leaving in 2013 and joining Ubisoft as a producer.
Adrian Selby worked on additional support. Selby joined Criterion in 2002 as a producer before leaving in 2009 and becoming a producer at Disney. After 2011 Selby worked at some non-video game companies like BP before joining Boss Alien in 2015.
Harvey Wheaton worked on additional support. Wheaton previously worked at companies including JPMorgan Chase before joining EA in 2003. In 2007 and 2008 he was COO/director of product development at Criterion before joining Supermassive in 2008 as their studio director. At the end of 2013 he left and, after working as a consultant for over a year, joined Codeclan in 2015. In 2017 he became executive producer at Natural Motion.
Graeme Williams worked on additional support. Williams worked at Virtuality, Psygnosis and Rebellion before joining Criterion in 2002 as head of product management. In 2004 he became development director before leaving in 2008. After five months at Supermassive Williams joined VIrtual Toys where he worked until 2011. He next joined Digital Chocolate before joining Ubisoft in 2013. From 2014-2016 he worked at Guerrilla before taking a break and joining Virtually Live in 2017.
Paul Dibden worked as an additional artist. Dibden joined EA in 2005 as a graduate artist before eventually becoming a development director. In 2013 he left and co-founded Milkcap before joining Splash Damage in 2015 as a producer.
John Humphries worked as an additional artist. Humphries previously worked at Bubball before joining EA in 2005. In 2008 Humphries left and joined Realtime Worlds as a lead environmental artist. In 2010 he founded Onyx Digital.
Vincent Jenkins worked as an additional artist. Jenkins joined EA in 2006 as a concept artist before joining Codemasters in 2008, where he worked until 2011. Jenkins has mostly worked as an artist for films, including Rogue One, Game of Thrones and Casino Royale. He last worked on concept art for Solo.
Rasmus Jorgensen worked as an additional artist. Jorgensen joined EA in 2000 as a concept artist before leaving in 2007 to join Codemasters. In 2010 Jorgensen left and spent about a year at Leading Light, Double Negative and Ghost A/S before joining IO in 2014.
Jason Lord worked as an additional artist. Lord joined EA in 1993 and worked as a video director until 2012. In 2012 Lord started Liquid Crimson, which has worked with companies including Square Enix, Supermassive, Hello Games, Microsoft, IGN and Capcom.
Osman Nazlivatan worked as an additional artist. Nazlivatan previously worked freelance and at Argonaut before joining EA in 2004 as a technical artist. In 2007 Nazlivatan left, and after months freelance at Big Head, joined Hotch Potch as lead artist/director. In 2011 Nazlivatan left and after under a year at both Natural Motion and Sony joined King in 2014. In 2016 Nazlivatan left King but I’m unable to find what they’ve done after. Edit: Nazlivatan is still at King
Justin Rae worked as an additional artist. Rae joined EA in 1996 and was lead artist on F.A. Premier Manager games. In 2008 Rae left and became director of art at Supermassive before starting his own company, Studio 96, in 2016.
Peter Reeve worked as an additional artist. Reeve previously worked at a few different companies before joining EA in 2004 as a video editor. In 2008 Reeve joined Black Rock before freelance in 2009 and working with companies including EA and Crytek. He currently works at RMV Productions.
Dean Stolpmann worked as an additional artist. Stolpmann worked as an artist at companies including Frontier and Sony before joining Criterion/EA in 2005. In 2007 Stolpmann joined Outso and Codemasters before joining Supermassive as art director in 2010. Stolpmann joined Gameloft shortly after before becoming head 3D tutor at South Seas Film & TV school in 2013.
Avril Lavigne sang the song “Girlfriend” which was featured in the game. The song released in 2007 and the music video has been viewed over 400 million times. Lavigne also recorded the chorus of the song in 8 different languages.The song also got another version with Lil Mama.
submitted by Forestl to Games [link] [comments]

ULTRA CANADA

Hey Ultra Nauts! I've been wondering why we haven't received an Ultra Music Festival here in our beautiful country, Canada.
A population of now almost 40 million people, mainly all located on the East Coast who are each and every day hungry for endless of entertainment. Especially in locations like Toronto and Montreal. The two major cities in Canada. We are a country built by migration and share the same culture as the United States of America.
Ultra has established all around the world with "ULTRA WORLDWIDE", especially in countries like Mexico, Singapore, South Africa, Korea, Taiwan, and many other areas. So why not Canada?
Here is why I believe ULTRA CANADA would work. In Canada, our dollar is cheaper meaning many Americans will attend this festival with a cheaper cost which would allow easily for the tickets to be sold. Marijuana is legal while in some States in the US like Florida it is not, the drinking age here is 18 while in the US it's 21. Having these advantages would allow hundreds up to thousands of Americans to consider partying here in our Country with a festival as huge as Ultra being played. Especially Americans up in the North.
Furthermore, our cities in Canada are all close to one another, Montreal, Quebec City, Ottawa, Trois Riviere, and Toronto, except Vancouver of course. These Canadian cities are also close to the Northern cities in the US like Boston, New York, Washington DC, Detroit, Cleaveland, Pittsburg, Toronto ( Ohio ) and that is without including the Towns and Villages in our Country and in the Northern side of the States.

To continue, because Canada is a country built by immigrants, I can easily picture people like in Europe to come and attend the Festival like the one in Miami, since people from Europe have family here and I am confident they would love to party with their loved ones in a beautiful festival like Ultra. The Euro is strong and their trip to here will be even cheaper than visiting the United States, so sales of tickets should sell out even quicker than the festival in Florida.

My recommended location for ULTRA CANADA would be either Toronto or Montreal, especially Montreal on the Formula 1 Race Track which is located on an Island connected to a 6 Flags Amusement Park, a major Casino, and Two Museums. Now hear me out! This isn't Virginia Key! The island is accessed to a Metro system that is connected directly to Montreal and Longueuil. It is also connected to the Major bridge "The Jacque Cartier bridge", another small bridge and of course a dock for boats. The venue is capable of holding up to 60 000 people which is more than Bayfront Park and just 20 000 less than the major festival located in Belgium which I will not speak of. There are of course many other possible venues but this one is my favorite. We can consider Montreal as the Northen little brother of Miami. The city is known for partying and clubbing all night. Its located directly near the water like Toronto and its always ready for new and exciting ideas.
As for dates, I was thinking the month of June where the weather gets pretty warm here and beautiful. It's also the month where 1000s of Americans come and visit for our shows and of course the Formula 1 race. Ultra can establish on the venue either before or right after the major Formula 1 race.

To conclude from all of this, I and plenty of Canadians are still shocked that Ultra hasn't established here yet, consider the profit it can make. We can only pray and hope.

THANK YOU for taking the time and reading my first ever Reddit post. Much love and respect to you all!

- A fellow Canadian who is a massive fan of Ultra <3
submitted by CallMePaulChek to UMF [link] [comments]

Cashed Out Casino (2017) - YouTube Room tour of Room 1110 at Semiahmoo Resort Neah Bay WA The End Of The Road ans Lake Quinault .wmv Casino Slot Machine Manipulation Is Totally Possible - YouTube Port Alberni Toy Run What is the best hotel in Vancouver Canada? Top 3 best Vancouver hotels as by travelers Casino Backoff for Card Counting - Blackjack ... Vancouver Island Vacation Travel Guide  Expedia - YouTube Is Bigfoot Going To Our City Park ? The 10 Best Places To Live In Washington State - YouTube

ILANI CASINO RESORT. 1 Cowlitz Way Ridgefield, WA 98642 (877) GO.ILANI (877) 464-5164 "ilani" means "to sing" in the Cowlitz language. The casino is one of seven managed and finanaced by Mohawk Gaming and Entertainment, headquartered in Connecticut. Casino • Live Dealer • Poker • Sports #1 Choice of U.S. Players! Mobile, tablet and desktop! $3,750 in Welcome Bonuses! BOVADA. The ilani ... Find Local Casinos Near You in 2020 - Use our complete Local Casino Finder to quickly see all local & land-based casinos in the United States today. Locate Casinos near Vancouver, Washington This guide has reviews on the top casinos near Vancouver, WA. Also shown are the casino floor size in square feet and the miles from Vancouver with drive time. Note the Spirit Mountain casino is across the border in Oregon. The casino pages have pictures, gaming details for slots, baccarat, blackjack ... Vancouver, WA 98661. 2. Vancouver Casino Dealer School. Casinos (360) 852-8264. 10637 NE Coxley Dr Ste 107. Vancouver, WA 98662. 3. Gold City Casino Online. Casinos Card Playing Rooms (1) 1. YEARS WITH. Website More Info. Serving the Vancouver Area. EW. I don't understand what you're asking me. 4. Horse Players Bet. Casinos. Website View Menu (877) 782-9994. 6130 NE 78th Ct Ste C4. Portland ... Casino Near Vancouver Wa, casino free spins promotion, utensil poker chicken invaders, blackjack mfg. 800,000. Golden Gorilla. Claim now. €300 Welcome Bonus and 100 free spins waiting on MasonSlots Casino. September 13, 2020 admin. Piggy Riches. Spellcast Touch. Lottery. Choose your lucky numbers and potentially win millions. 250%. $12,000, . , . ... Best Casinos in Vancouver, WA 98660 - ilani (2.4/5), The Last Frontier Casino (5/5), Palace Casino (3.1/5), Wild Bill's (5/5), Double Down Saloon & Casinos (5/5), Diamond Darcy's (4.2/5), P R I M E Showboat Columbia (No ratings), Dotty's (5/5), The Game Poker Club (3.9/5) Map showing the location of casinos near Vancouver Washington with drive time, distance, map and casino description. Our Favorite Casinos . Vancouver, WA Casino Map. Mobile Format. Home. Casino Finder. Casino Amenities . Cruise Ship Casinos. Race Courses. Casino News. Casino Owners. About Slots. Online Casinos. Online Casinos. Worldwide Casinos. Africa. Asia. Australia (area) Caribbean. Europe ... Darrington, WA 98241. Quil Ceda Creek Casino 6410 33rd Ave NE Tulalip, WA 98271 360-716-1700. Tulalip Resort Casino Tulalip Tribes 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd. Tulalip, WA 98271 (360) 651-1111. Tulalip Bingo 2911 Quil Ceda Way Tulalip, WA 98271 800-631-3313. SPOKANE COUNTY. Northern Quest Resort & Casino 100 North Hayford Road Airway Heights, WA 99001 (509) 242-7000. Spokane Tribe Casino 14300 W SR-2 ... Casinos near Vancouver, WA Browse URComped’s up-to-date list of the 50 closest casinos to Vancouver, WA It's no surprise that therea are a handful of casinos 30 minutes from Vancouver, WA. (10 casinos within easy driving range actually!) ilani is now open. ilani is a premier gaming destination in Washington State in Ridgefield. Located 25 miles away from Portland (WA), come and play in our new casino with abundant dining, shopping and entertainment options to make your visit memorable.

[index] [20326] [20110] [22330] [21534] [24729] [7407] [29098] [6285] [20190] [13749]

Cashed Out Casino (2017) - YouTube

History The name "Neah" refers to the Makah Chief Dee-ah, pronounced Neah in the Klallam language. The town is named for the waterbody Neah Bay, which acquired its name in the early 19th century ... Colin is one of the Pros from Blackjack Apprenticeship, as well as the subject of the documentary "Holy Rollers: The True Story of Card Counting Christians."... Vancouver Island – a place of awe-inspiring natural beauty. In this video, discover why the fusion of history and rugged West Coast landscapes makes this des... Named for the first president of the United States. Washington is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. With more than 7.4 million pe... List of hotels in Vancouver Canada : 2400 Motel Vancouver Best Western Peace Arch Inn Vancouver Best Western Plus Coquitlam Inn Convention Centre Best Western Plus Regency Inn & Conference Centre ... 10 Secrets Casinos Don't Want You to Know. Subscribe for more amazing videos! http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-Richest Casinos are multi-million dollar business... It seemed speculative enough so I ventured off to our neighbourhood hilltop park which is attached to the many greenbelts system within this city, also surrounded by ocean as it is on a peninsula ... 40th Annual Vancouver Motorcycle Toy Run 2018 (part 2) ... Stamp Falls near Port Alberni in Vancouver Island - Duration: 2:10. Maisie Wong 4,176 views. 2:10. Swept Away Inn - Shaw TV Port Alberni ... Located just across the Canadian border south of Vancouver, we loved our visit to Semiahmoo Resort. Watch the drama unfold when the city of Las Vegas blows up the town's impromptu movie set. For more content visit: https://www.facebook.com/lasvegascasinomus...

#